Norway


  • 5-June-2018

    English

    Higher Education in Norway - Labour Market Relevance and Outcomes

    The higher education system in Norway generally produces graduates with good skills and labour market outcomes. This success can be largely attributed to Norway’s robust and inclusive labour market and recent higher education reforms to improve quality. However, some Norwegian students have poor labour market outcomes and past success is no guarantee of future success, especially as the Norwegian economy upskills and diversifies. This report provides advice and recommendations to improve the labour market relevance and the outcomes of higher education in Norway. The analysis finds that there is an opportunity to expand work-based learning opportunities, improve career guidance, and do a better job of using innovative learning and teaching practices to improve labour market relevance across the system. The report concludes that Norwegian policy makers have a larger role to play in steering the system. Policy makers can set the conditions for greater labour market relevance by strengthening the mechanism for collaboration between higher education institutions and employers, ensuring better coordination and use of labour market information, and redoubling efforts to support quality learning and teaching. This report was developed as part of the OECD Enhancing Higher Education System Performance project.
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Family-friendly policies a key driver of economic growth

    The family-friendly policies introduced by Nordic countries over the past 50 years and associated increases in female employment have boosted growth in GDP per capita by between 10% and 20%, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, commonly known as the Nordic countries, have been leaders in the development of modern family and gender policy, and the explicit promotion of gender equality at home, at work, and in public life. Today, on many measures, they boast some of the most gender-equal labour markets in the OECD.
    This report shows that improvements in gender equality have contributed considerably to economic growth in the Nordic countries. Increases in female employment alone are estimated to account for anywhere between roughly 0.05 and 0.40 percentage points to average annual GDP per capita growth – equivalent to 3 to 20% of total GDP per capita growth over the past 50 years or so, depending on the country.
    The Nordic countries are closer than most to achieving gender equality in the labour market. But the last mile may well prove to be the longest one. To make further progress, a continued assessment of the effectiveness of existing public policies and workplace practices is needed. Only with resolve and a continued focus can Nordic countries ensure that men and women contribute to their economies and societies in gender equal measure.
     
  • 5-April-2018

    English

    Norway should do more to improve job prospects of low-skilled youth

    Norway should step up its efforts to boost the job prospects of young people without upper-secondary qualification to further reduce the share of under-30 year-olds who are Not in Employment, Education or Training (NEETs), according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 5-April-2018

    English

    Investing in Youth: Norway

    The present report on Norway is part of the series on 'Investing in Youth' which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the areas of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on young people who are not in employment, education or training (the 'NEETs').Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017).
  • 19-December-2017

    English

    Government at a Glance

    Government at a Glance provides a dashboard of key indicators to help you analyse international comparisons of public sector performance.

  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Addressing the challenges in higher education in Norway

    Norway’s predominately public and tuition-fee free tertiary education system encourages participation and has high attainment rates. However, challenges in spending efficiency, study times, skills demand, inclusiveness and quality remain.

    Related Documents
  • 27-November-2014

    English

    Recruiting Immigrant Workers: Norway 2014

    Norway is characterised by very high levels of migration from within the European Economic Area (EEA) and growing but small scale labour migration from countries outside the EEA. In this context, the challenge for managing discretionary labour migration is to ensure it complements EEA flows. High-skilled workers who come to Norway often leave, even if their employer would like to keep them. Norway has many international students, but most appear to leave at graduation or in the years that follow. The spouses of skilled migrants – usually educated and talented themselves – face challenges in finding employment, and this may cause the whole family to leave. Key industries in smaller population centres wonder how they will source talent in the future. This review examines these aspects of the Norwegian labour migration system. It considers the efficiency of procedures and whether the system is capable of meeting demand. It looks at several policy measures that were implemented and withdrawn, and assesses how these and other mechanisms could be better applied. The characteristics and behaviour of past labour migrants is examined to suggest means of encouraging promising immigrants to remain, and how Norway might attract the specific labour migrants from which it can most benefit in the future.
  • 18-February-2014

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Norway 2014

    Skills are central to Norway’s future prosperity and the well-being of its people. This diagnostic report identifies 12 skills challenges for Norway which were distilled from a series of interactive diagnostic workshops held in the course of 2013 with a wide range of stakeholders in Oslo, Buskerud County and Nordland County.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Norway draws upon a wide range of OECD comparative data and analysis to illustrate each skills challenge and offers insights from the experience of other countries in tackling similar skills challenges. The first nine skills challenges refer to specific outcomes across the three pillars of developing, activating and using skills. The last three skills challenges refer to the 'enabling' conditions which strengthen the overall skills system. 
  • 12-November-2013

    English

    Country specific-material

    Two rounds of the Survey of Adult Skills are under way: Round 1 (2008-13) with 24 participating countries, whose results were released in October 2013, and Round 2 (2012-16) with 9 participating countries, whose results will be released in 2016. A third round is scheduled to begin in May 2014.

    Related Documents
  • 1 | 2 | 3 > >>