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  • 27-March-2019

    English

    Society at a Glance 2019 - OECD Social Indicators

    This report, the ninth edition of the biennial OECD overview of social indicators, addresses the growing demand for quantitative evidence on social well-being and its trends. This year’s edition presents 25 indicators, several of which are new, and includes data for 36 OECD member countries and, where available, key partners (Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russia and South Africa) and other G20 countries (Argentina and Saudi Arabia). The report features a special chapter on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: their numbers, how they fare in terms of economic outcomes and well-being, and what policies can improve LGBT inclusivity. It also includes a special section based on the 2018 OECD Risks That Matter Survey on people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and the extent to which they think governments address those risks. In addition, the report provides a guide to help readers in understanding the structure of OECD social indicators.
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  • 19-March-2019

    English

    Society at a Glance: Asia/Pacific 2019

    This is the fourth edition of Society at a Glance Asia/Pacific, the OECD’s overview of social indicators for the region. The report addresses the growing demand for quantitative evidence on social well-being and its trends across countries in Asia and the Pacific.  Chapter 1 introduces this volume and provides readers with a guide to help them interpret OECD social indicators. Chapter 2 focuses on issues around extending coverage and the future of social protection in Asia and the Pacific. Already, there are many workers in Asia and the Pacific whose job does not entitle them to social and health supports. Digitalisation and changes in the nature of work may lead to further job-loss, but also increase economic labour market and economic inequalities between high- and low-skilled workers; workers with and without access to social benefits. These rising inequalities will further challenge social policy development in its quest to get support to those who need it most. The chapter includes some country programme examples to illustrate possible policy responses. Chapter 3 to 7 each present five indicators on general context, self-sufficiency, equity, health and social cohesion.
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  • 28-February-2019

    English

    Social Benefit Recipients Database (SOCR)

    The OECD’s Social Benefit Recipients Database (SOCR) presents comparable information on the number of people receiving cash benefits. SOCR includes data for the main income replacement programmes in the unemployment, social assistance, disability and old-age branches. It currently covers six years (2007-2012) for most OECD and EU countries.

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  • 7-January-2019

    English

    OECD Policy Workshop on Enhancing Child Well-being, 16th January 2019

    A policy workshop held at the OECD headquarters on the 16th January 2019 consisting of four sessions of a panel discussions among key experts and civil society, to discuss how to make poverty reduction policies more effective and sustainable for the hardest to reach population groups and how best to meet the multiple needs of families.

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  • 3-December-2018

    English

    OECD/Korea Policy Centre – Health and Social Policy Programmes

    The OECD/Korea Policy Centre fosters the exchange of technical information and policy experiences relating to the Asia Pacific region in areas such as health statistics, pension reforms and social policy and expenditure.

  • 7-November-2018

    English

    The Future of Social Protection - What Works for Non-standard Workers?

    Social protection systems are often still designed for the archetypical full-time dependent employee. Work patterns deviating from this model – be it self-employment or online 'gig work' – can lead to gaps in social protection coverage. Globalisation and digitalisation are likely to exacerbate this discrepancy as new technologies make it easier and cheaper to offer and find work online, and online work platforms have experienced spectacular growth in recent years. While new technologies and the new forms of work they create bring the incomplete social protection of non-standard workers to the forefront of the international policy debate, non-standard work and policies to address such workers’ situation are not new: across the OECD on average, one in six workers is self-employed, and a further one in eight employees is on a temporary contract. Thus, there are lessons to be learned from country experiences of providing social protection to non-standard workers. This report presents seven policy examples from OECD countries, including the 'artists’ insurance system' in Germany or voluntary unemployment insurance for self-employed workers in Sweden. It draws on these studies to suggest policy options for providing social protection for non-standard workers, and for increasing the income security of on-call workers and those on flexible hours contracts.
  • 15-October-2018

    English, PDF, 662kb

    Poor children in rich countries: Why we need policy action (Policy brief)

    Today, nearly 1 in 7 children lives in poverty on average in the OECD, and children often face higher poverty risks than other population groups. To tackle the issue, this policy brief says that a significant reduction in child poverty can be achieved through better coverage and targeting of benefits towards poor children. Among the other recommendations are making work pay for both parents ...

  • 19-June-2018

    English

    Faces of Joblessness - Towards People-centred Employment Support

    The European Commission, the OECD and the World Bank launched this new project to shed light on the barriers that individuals face in getting good-quality jobs.

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  • 15-June-2018

    English

    A Broken Social Elevator? How to Promote Social Mobility

    This report provides new evidence on social mobility in the context of increased inequalities of income and opportunities in OECD and selected emerging economies. It covers the aspects of both social mobility between parents and children and of personal income mobility over the life course, and their drivers. The report shows that social mobility from parents to offspring is low across the different dimensions of earnings, education, occupation and health, and that the same prevails for personal income mobility over the life course. There is in particular a lack of mobility at the bottom and at the top of the social ladder – with 'sticky floors' preventing upward mobility for many and 'sticky ceilings' associated with opportunity hoarding at the top. The lack of social mobility has economic, societal and political consequences. This report shows that there is space for policies to make societies more mobile and protect households from adverse income shocks. It discusses the options and measures that policy makers can consider how to improve social mobility across and within generations.
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, commonly known as the Nordic countries, have been leaders in the development of modern family and gender policy, and the explicit promotion of gender equality at home, at work, and in public life. Today, on many measures, they boast some of the most gender-equal labour markets in the OECD.This report shows that improvements in gender equality have contributed considerably to economic growth in the Nordic countries. Increases in female employment alone are estimated to account for anywhere between roughly 0.05 and 0.40 percentage points to average annual GDP per capita growth – equivalent to 3 to 20% of total GDP per capita growth over the past 50 years or so, depending on the country.The Nordic countries are closer than most to achieving gender equality in the labour market. But the last mile may well prove to be the longest one. To make further progress, a continued assessment of the effectiveness of existing public policies and workplace practices is needed. Only with resolve and a continued focus can Nordic countries ensure that men and women contribute to their economies and societies in gender equal measure. 
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