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  • 22-November-2018

    English

    Health Care Quality and Outcomes

    Providing patients with care that is safe, effective and responsive to patient needs is now recognised as the foremost objective of health systems in all OECD countries. We measure quality of care and help governments identify the drivers of high-quality care as the cornerstone of quality improvement.

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  • 22-November-2018

    English

    Health at a Glance: Europe 2018 - State of Health in the EU Cycle

    Health at a Glance: Europe 2018 presents comparative analyses of the health status of EU citizens and the performance of the health systems of the 28 EU Member States, 5 candidate countries and 3 EFTA countries. It is the first step in the State of Health in the EU cycle of knowledge brokering. This publication has two parts. Part I comprises two thematic chapters, the first focusing on the need for concerted efforts to promote better mental health, the second outlining possible strategies for reducing wasteful spending in health. In Part II, the most recent trends in key indicators of health status, risk factors and health spending are presented, together with a discussion of progress in improving the effectiveness, accessibility and resilience of European health systems.
  • 8-November-2018

    English

    OECD Health Statistics 2018

    OECD Health Statistics 2018 is the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. All datasets have been updated on 8 November 2018.

  • 8-November-2018

    English, Excel, 4,004kb

    OECD Health Statistics 2018: Frequently Requested Data (Excel file)

    Download this selection of key indicators from OECD Health Statistics 2018, in Excel. Final 2018 version, updated on 8 November 2018.

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  • 7-November-2018

    English, PDF, 2,366kb

    Stemming the Superbug Tide - Policy Brief

    This Policy Brief gives an insight to key messages and various highlights from the new OECD report "Stemming the Superbug Tide: Just a Few Dollars More", which analyses the impact of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The report, based on new forecasts of the growth in resistance to 2050, outlines how countries can tackle AMR and significantly reduce the personal and economic costs.

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  • 7-November-2018

    English

    Stemming the Superbug Tide - Just A Few Dollars More

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a large and growing problem with the potential for enormous health and economic consequences, globally. As such, AMR has become a central issue at the top of the public health agenda of OECD countries and beyond. In this report, OECD used advanced techniques, including machine learning, ensemble modelling and a microsimulation model, to provide support for policy action in the human health sector. AMR rates are high and are projected to grow further, particularly for second- and third-line antibiotics, and if no effective action is taken this is forecasted to produce a significant health and economic burden in OECD and EU28 countries. This burden can be addressed by implementing effective public health initiatives. This report reviews policies currently in place in high-income countries and identifies a set of ‘best buys’ to tackle AMR that, if scaled up at the national level, would provide an affordable and cost-effective instrument in the fight against AMR.
  • 7-November-2018

    English

    Public Health

    The OECD work on public health explores major risk factors including obesity, diet, physical activity, alcohol consumption, tobacco and environmental risks, as well as antimicrobial resistance.

  • 7-November-2018

    English

    The Future of Social Protection - What Works for Non-standard Workers?

    Social protection systems are often still designed for the archetypical full-time dependent employee. Work patterns deviating from this model – be it self-employment or online 'gig work' – can lead to gaps in social protection coverage. Globalisation and digitalisation are likely to exacerbate this discrepancy as new technologies make it easier and cheaper to offer and find work online, and online work platforms have experienced spectacular growth in recent years. While new technologies and the new forms of work they create bring the incomplete social protection of non-standard workers to the forefront of the international policy debate, non-standard work and policies to address such workers’ situation are not new: across the OECD on average, one in six workers is self-employed, and a further one in eight employees is on a temporary contract. Thus, there are lessons to be learned from country experiences of providing social protection to non-standard workers. This report presents seven policy examples from OECD countries, including the 'artists’ insurance system' in Germany or voluntary unemployment insurance for self-employed workers in Sweden. It draws on these studies to suggest policy options for providing social protection for non-standard workers, and for increasing the income security of on-call workers and those on flexible hours contracts.
  • 31-October-2018

    English

    Child poverty in the OECD : Trends, determinants and policies to tackle it (OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers No. 218)

    This paper provides an overview of the main trends in child income poverty since the mid-2000s, and explores to what extent child poverty trends are linked to demographic, policy and/or labour market changes. Trends in poverty and the standard of living of children in low-income families since the onset of the Great Recession are also closely examined.

  • 29-October-2018

    English

    Just released: "Skills on the Move - Migrants in the Survey of Adult Skills"

    Drawing on data from the OECD Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), this report reviews the differences in migrants’ characteristics and considers how they relate to the actual skills migrants possess. It examines the relationship between migrants’ skills and their labour and non-labour market outcomes in host countries and sheds new light on how migrants’ skills are developed, used and valued in host country labour markets and societies.

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