Latest Documents


  • 15-October-2015

    English, PDF, 652kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2015: Key findings for Latvia

    The economic crisis had deep impacts on the Latvian labour market, but the recovery has been equally remarkable. The employment rate dropped from 70% in Q4 2007 to 57% in Q1 2010, but has since been increasing strongly. The fall in unemployment has been particularly marked among youth.

  • 15-October-2015

    English

    Large scope to boost productivity through a better allocation of talent

    Raising productivity growth is highly dependent on a country’s ability to innovate and adopt technologies, which requires an effective supply of human capital

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  • 8-October-2015

    English

    Antimicrobial Resistance in G7 Countries and Beyond

    Antimicrobial therapies have played an essential role in the treatment of infections in humans and animals and have significantly improved population health. All these applications are now endangered by the increasing spread of microbes that are resistant to antimicrobial medications. The OECD will present during the G7 Health Ministers Meeting in Berlin on October 8 some key findings and policy recommendations on how to deal with AMR.

  • 8-October-2015

    English

    World Indicators of Skills for Employment (WISE): new OECD database

    In 2010, the G20 called for the development of a set of internationally comparable indicators of skills for employment and productivity for Low-Income Countries (LIC) as part of its Multi-Year Action Plan on Development. To respond to this call, the OECD has established the World Indicators of Skills for Employment (WISE) database in close collaboration with the World Bank, ETF, ILO and UNESCO

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  • 5-October-2015

    English, PDF, 539kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2015-Key findings for Colombia

    Colombia has experienced strong and sustained economic growth over the past fifteen years, apart from a short slowdown in 2008 and 2009, and labour market outcomes improved significantly.

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  • 5-October-2015

    English

    Health Data Governance - Privacy, Monitoring and Research

    All countries are investing in health data. There are however significant cross-country differences in data availability and use. Some countries stand out for their innovative practices enabling privacy-protective data use while others are falling behind with insufficient data and restrictions that limit access to and use of data, even by government itself. Countries that develop a data governance framework that enables privacy-protective data use will not only have the information needed to promote quality, efficiency and performance in their health systems, they will become a more attractive centre for medical research. After examining the current situation in OECD countries, a multi-disciplinary advisory panel of experts identified eight key data governance mechanisms to maximise benefits to patients and to societies from the collection, linkage and analysis of health data and to, at the same time, minimise risks to the privacy of patients and to the security of health data. These mechanisms include coordinated development of high-value, privacy-protective health information systems, legislation that permits privacy-protective data use, open and transparent public communication, accreditation or certification of health data processors, transparent and fair project approval processes, data de-identification and data security practices that meet legal requirements and public expectations without compromising data utility and a process to continually assess and renew the data governance framework as new data and new risks emerge.

  • 2-October-2015

    English

    Mental Health and Work: Austria

    Tackling mental ill-health of the working-age population is becoming a key issue for labour market and social policies in OECD countries. OECD governments increasingly recognise that policy has a major role to play in keeping people with mental ill-health in employment or bringing those outside of the labour market back to it, and in preventing mental illness. This report on Austria is the eighth in a series of reports looking at how the broader education, health, social and labour market policy challenges identified in Sick on the Job? Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work (OECD, 2012) are being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It concludes that the Austrian system provides good opportunities in principle for improving labour market inclusion of people with mental ill-health but that structural fragmentation of responsibilities limits the means of the federal government to develop coherent health and work policies. Successful structural reform requires including a range of actors responsible for policy implementation to achieve coordination across institutions and better integrated service delivery.

  • 1-October-2015

    English

    The growing importance of social skills in the labour market

    The fact remains that robots have persistently failed to imitate the most human of skills, such empathy, teamwork, relationship building, etc. While technology may be reducing the demand for some routine skills, it is simultaneously increasing the demand for more difficult-to-automate social skills.

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  • 24-September-2015

    English

    OECD Centre for Opportunity and Equality

    The OECD Centre for Opportunity and Equality is a new platform for promoting and conducting policy-oriented research on the trends, causes and consequences of inequalities in society and the economy, and a forum to discuss how policies can best address such inequalities.

  • 24-September-2015

    English

    Fiscal Sustainability of Health Systems - Bridging Health and Finance Perspectives

    The health systems we enjoy today, and expected medical advances in the future, will be difficult to finance from public resources without major reforms. Public health spending in OECD countries has grown rapidly over most of the last half century. These spending increases have contributed to important progress in population health: for example, life expectancy at birth has increased, rising on average by ten years since 1970. The challenge now is to sustain and enhance these achievements in a context of tight fiscal constraints in many countries combined with upward pressure on health spending from factors such as new technological advances and demographic changes. Finding policies that can make health spending more sustainable without compromising important achievements in access and quality requires effective co-operation between health and finance ministries. Sound governance and co-ordination mechanisms are therefore essential to ensure effective policy choices. Prepared by both public finance and health experts, this report provides a unique detailed overview of institutional frameworks for financing health care in OECD countries. One of the main features of this book is a comprehensive mapping of budgeting practices and governance structure in health across OECD countries.

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