Share

Latest Documents


  • 8-August-2018

    English, PDF, 140kb

    What the OECD can bring to work on Universal Health Coverage

    The OECD core mission to promote policies to improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world brings much relevant experience supporting countries to achieve and sustain universal health coverage (UHC).

    Related Documents
  • 3-August-2018

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Systems: A series of country reports

    Those in-depth studies of the health system of member countries focus on economic issues. They assess the performance of health systems in a comparative context, identify the main challenges faced by the country health system and put forward policy options to better meet them. Reviews are initiated at the request of the country to be examined and emphasis is placed on specific issues of key policy interest.

    Related Documents
  • 12-July-2018

    English

    Opioids

    Opioids use has dramatically increased in some OECD countries, both of prescribed and illicit opioids. This has led to a sharp upsurge in addiction and overdose deaths, with serious social and economic consequences. In this scenario, the OECD is analysing the opioids epidemic and exploring several policy strategies that can help countries to address the issue.

    Related Documents
  • 5-July-2018

    English

    Delivering Quality Health Services: A Global Imperative

    Universal health coverage (UHC) aims to provide health security and universal access to essential care services without financial hardship to individuals, families and communities. UHC enables a transition to more productive and equitable societies and economies and is enshrined in the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). But UHC should not be implemented without considering the quality of the care provided. Quality means care that is effective, safe, people-centered, timely, equitable, integrated and efficient. High-quality care improves health outcomes and reduces waste. It is integral to a high-value, sustainable health system. Universal access to high-quality health care is not a luxury only rich countries can afford. It can be achieved in all settings with strong leadership, planning and implementation. The returns are worth the investment. While significant progress has been made to improve care quality has been made, more effort is needed in both developing and developed countries. This report describes the current situation with regard to UHC and global quality of care, and outlines the steps governments, health services and their workers, together with citizens and patients need to urgently take.
  • 4-July-2018

    English

    OECD Employment Outlook 2018

    The 2018 edition of the OECD Employment Outlook reviews labour market trends and prospects in OECD countries. Chapter 1 presents recent labour market developments. Wage growth remains sluggish due to low inflation expectations, weak productivity growth and adverse trends in low-pay jobs. Chapter 2 looks at the decline of the labour share and shows that this is partially related to the emergence of 'superstar' firms, which invest massively in capital-intensive technologies. Chapter 3 investigates the role of collective bargaining institutions for labour market performance. Systems that co-ordinate wages across sectors are associated with better employment outcomes, but firm-level adjustments of sector-level agreements are sometimes required to avoid adverse effects on productivity. Chapter 4 examines the role of policy to facilitate the transition towards new jobs of workers who were dismissed for economic reasons, underlying the need of early interventions in the unemployment spell. Chapter 5 analyses jobseekers' access to unemployment benefits and shows that most jobseekers do not receive unemployment benefits and coverage has often been falling since the Great Recession. Chapter 6 investigates the reason why the gender gap in labour income increases over the working life, stressing the role of the lower professional mobility of women around childbirth.
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 28-June-2018

    English, PDF, 1,423kb

    Spending on Health: Latest Trends

    Health spending back on a growth path after the slowdown following the financial crisis. Read about the latest health spending trends in this Policy Brief issued for the release of the database OECD Health Statistics 2018

    Related Documents
  • 20-June-2018

    English

    International Migration Outlook 2018

    The 2018 edition of International Migration Outlook analyses recent developments in migration movements and policies in OECD countries and some non member countries, and looks at the evolution of the labour market outcomes of immigrants in OECD countries, with a focus on the migrants’ job quality and on the sections and occupations in which they are concentrated. It includes two special chapters on the contribution of recent refugee flows to the labour force and on the illegal employment of foreign workers. It also includes country notes and a statistical annex.
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 19-June-2018

    English

    Faces of Joblessness - Towards People-centred Employment Support

    The European Commission, the OECD and the World Bank launched this new project to shed light on the barriers that individuals face in getting good-quality jobs.

    Related Documents
  • 15-June-2018

    English

    A Broken Social Elevator? How to Promote Social Mobility

    This report provides new evidence on social mobility in the context of increased inequalities of income and opportunities in OECD and selected emerging economies. It covers the aspects of both social mobility between parents and children and of personal income mobility over the life course, and their drivers. The report shows that social mobility from parents to offspring is low across the different dimensions of earnings, education, occupation and health, and that the same prevails for personal income mobility over the life course. There is in particular a lack of mobility at the bottom and at the top of the social ladder – with 'sticky floors' preventing upward mobility for many and 'sticky ceilings' associated with opportunity hoarding at the top. The lack of social mobility has economic, societal and political consequences. This report shows that there is space for policies to make societies more mobile and protect households from adverse income shocks. It discusses the options and measures that policy makers can consider how to improve social mobility across and within generations.
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10