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  • 15-October-2020

    English, PDF, 2,713kb

    Social housing: A key part of past and future housing policy (Policy Brief on Affordable Housing)

    Social housing makes up nearly 30 million dwellings and about 6% of the housing stock in the OECD, but the size, scope, target population and type of provider vary widely across countries. Renewed investment in social housing should be a central part of a more sustainable, inclusive economic recovery.

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  • 29-May-2020

    English, PDF, 1,247kb

    Is Childcare Affordable?

    Building on information from the OECD Tax-Benefit Models and the OECD Family Database, this policy brief looks at childcare costs, their effect on financial incentives to work, and the barriers parents with very young children face when trying to avoid and escape poverty. The brief includes a discussion of policy options for making childcare more affordable.

  • 22-March-2020

    English

    Supporting people and companies to deal with the Covid-19 virus (Policy Brief)

    This policy brief is a first attempt at setting out the employment and social-policy tools at governments’ disposal to counter the economic and social impact of the Covid-19 crisis. It is accompanied by an overview table of countries’ policy responses, available online, which will be continuously updated.

  • 10-January-2020

    English

    Family Database in the Asia-Pacific Region

    •Family Database in the Asia-Pacific Region

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  • 28-October-2019

    English

    Rejuvenating Korea: Policies for a Changing Society

    Korean families are changing fast. While birth rates remain low, Koreans are marrying and starting a family later than ever before, if at all. Couple-with-children households, the dominant household type in Korea until recently, will soon make up fewer than one quarter of all households. These changes will have a profound effect on Korea’s future. Among other things, the Korean labour force is set to decline by about 2.5 million workers by 2040, with potential major implications for economic performance and the sustainability of public finances. Since the early 2000s, public policy has changed to help parents reconcile work and family commitments: Korea has developed a comprehensive formal day-care and kindergarten system with enrolment rates that are now on par with the Nordic countries. Korea also has one year of paid parental leave for both parents, but only about 25% of mothers and 5% of fathers use it, as workplace cultures are often not conducive to parents, especially fathers, taking leave. Cultural change will take time, but this review suggests there also is a need for additional labour market, education and social policy reform to help Koreans achieve both work and family aspirations, and contribute to the rejuvenation of Korean society.
  • 11-September-2019

    English

    Part-time and Partly Equal: Gender and Work in the Netherlands

    The Netherlands performs well on many measures of gender equality, but the country faces a persistent equality challenge between women and men: the high share of women in part-time jobs. Nearly 60% of women in the Dutch labour market work part-time, roughly three times the OECD average for women, and over three times the rate for Dutch men. The Netherlands’ gender gap in hours worked contributes to the gender gap in earnings, the gender gap in pensions, women’s slower progression into management roles, and the unequal division of unpaid work at home. These gaps typically widen with parenthood, as mothers often reduce hours in the labour market to take on more unpaid care work at home. The Dutch government must redouble its efforts to achieve gender equality. Better social policy support can help level the playing field between men and women, contribute to more egalitarian norms around the division of work, and foster more gender-equal behaviour in paid and unpaid work in the Netherlands.
  • 14-June-2019

    English

    Good Practice for Good Jobs in Early Childhood Education and Care

    Recruiting and retaining skilled staff is a long-standing challenge for the early childhood education and care (ECEC) sector. OECD countries are increasingly demanding that ECEC staff be highly skilled and highly qualified, but a combination of low wages, a lack of status and public recognition, poor working conditions, and limited opportunities for professional development mean that recruitment and retention are frequently difficult. What can countries do to build a highly qualified and well-trained ECEC workforce? What is the best route to increasing staff skills without exacerbating staff shortages? How can countries boost pay and working conditions in the context of limited resources? Building on past OECD work on early childhood education and care, and drawing on the experience of OECD countries, this report outlines good practice policy measures for improving jobs in ECEC and for constructing a high-quality workforce.
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  • 27-March-2019

    English

    LGBTI inclusiveness

    Despite a shift toward greater acceptance in most OECD countries, homo-, trans- and intersexphobia remain widespread, thereby putting LGBTI at risk of being discriminated against in dimensions critical for their well-being: family life, education, economic outcomes and health.

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  • 12-February-2019

    English, PDF, 3,252kb

    How can we help stop child labour (Policy brief)

    Eradicating the worst forms of child labour is not only a moral imperative, it is also essential for ensuring that children can fully enjoy their childhood and fulfil their potential. To reach this goal, it is necessary to monitor child labour trends and identify the forms of child labour that have the most serious consequences on children’s lives.

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  • 7-January-2019

    English

    OECD Policy Workshop on Enhancing Child Well-being, 16th January 2019

    A policy workshop held at the OECD headquarters on the 16th January 2019 consisting of four sessions of a panel discussions among key experts and civil society, to discuss how to make poverty reduction policies more effective and sustainable for the hardest to reach population groups and how best to meet the multiple needs of families.

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