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  • 3-September-2014

    English, PDF, 163kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2014 - Key findings for Belgium

    Belgium’s labour market continues to perform poorly relative to the OECD average. The employment rate of 61.8% (Q1 2014) is well below the OECD average and little changed from its pre-crisis level. Unemployment, at 8.5% in Q2 2014, remains close to peak levels, unlike in most other countries

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  • 3-September-2014

    English, PDF, 176kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2014 - Key findings for Hungary

    Hungary was hit harder by the global crisis than most OECD countries. Unemployment reached record levels at the peak of the crisis but has since recovered to its pre-crisis level around the current OECD average of 8%.

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  • 3-September-2014

    English, PDF, 163kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2014 - Key findings for Finland

    After a decade of robust growth, Finland was hit particularly hard by the 2009 economic and financial crisis. It went through a double-dip recession and output and employment are still significantly below their pre-crisis levels.

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  • 3-September-2014

    English, PDF, 160kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2014 - Key findings for Sweden

    During the crisis, Sweden’s unemployment rate increased by almost 3 percentage points, but part of this increase has now been reabsorbed. By July 2014, unemployment had fallen to 7.7%, well down from a peak of 8.9% in 2010.

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  • 3-September-2014

    English, PDF, 163kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2014 - Key findings for Greece

    Despite moderate signs of recovery across many OECD countries in 2014, the unemployment rate in Greece remains stuck at close to its highest level since the onset of the economic crisis (27.2% as of May 2014). OECD projections suggest that the expected joblessness rate in Greece will remain high (around 27%) through to the end of 2015.

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  • 3-September-2014

    English

    Jobs recovery to remain weak in 2015, says OECD

    Unemployment will remain well above its pre-crisis levels next year in most OECD countries, despite modest declines over the rest of 2014 and in 2015, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 3-September-2014

    English, PDF, 160kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2014 - Key findings for Switzerland

    Switzerland has high employment rates and low unemployment. The overall employment rate remained stable since the start of the crisis and stands at 79% (first quarter of 2014), the second highest in the OECD after Iceland, well above the OECD average of 65.6%. As for unemployment, among OECD countries only Japan, Korea, and Norway have lower unemployment rates.

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  • 15-July-2014

    English

    Connecting People with Jobs - Activation Policies in the United Kingdom

    This report examines recent activation policies in the United Kingdom aimed at moving people back into work. It offers insight into how countries can improve the effectiveness of their employment services and also control spending on benefits. The United Kingdom's policies have helped limit the rise in unemployment during the crisis. It has been at the forefront of reform efforts by OECD countries to transform and modernise

  • 18-June-2014

    English

    The 2012 Labour Market Reform in Spain - A Preliminary Assessment

    This report provides an initial evaluation of the comprehensive reform of the Spanish labour market undertaken in 2012. It describes the key components of the 2012 reform and places them in the context of the evolution of labour market institutions in other OECD member countries, with a particular focus on collective bargaining and employment protection legislation. The report also assesses the impact of the reform on the ability

  • 11-June-2014

    English

    Ageing and Employment Policies: France 2014 - Working Better with Age

    People today are living longer than ever before, while birth rates are dropping in the majority of OECD countries. In such demographics, public social expenditures require to be adequate and sustainable in the long term. Older workers play a crucial role in the labour market. Now that legal retirement ages are rising, older workers will work longer and employers will have to retain them. But those older workers who have lost their

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