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  • 10-July-2017

    English

    Adapting to changing skill needs

    The conference on Adapting to changing skill needs was an OECD event supported by the JPMorgan Chase Foundation. This event showcased the OECD Skills for Jobs database, providing detailed information about the skill needs of the labour markets in all EU countries and South Africa.

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  • 10-July-2017

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Skills for Jobs Indicators

    This report describes the construction of the database of skill needs indicators, i.e. the OECD Skills for Jobs Database, and presents initial results and analysis. It identifies the existing knowledge gaps concerning skills imbalances, providing the rationale for the development of the new skill needs and mismatch indicators. Moreover, it explains the methodology used to measure skills shortage, surplus and mismatch, and provides key results and insights from the data.

  • 5-July-2017

    English

    Who's who - Conference on Adapting to changing Skills

    Document to be posted as the who's who of the Conference with the speakers and moderator.

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  • 26-June-2017

    English, PDF, 194kb

    Agenda_Conference Changing Skills 10-07-2017

    The Conference, hosted by OECD, marks the end of the project on ‘Adapting to Changing Skill Needs’, conducted within the Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Directorate and supported by the JPMorgan Chase Foundation.

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  • 13-June-2017

    English

    OECD Employment Outlook 2017

    The 2017 edition of the OECD Employment Outlook reviews recent labour market trends and short-term prospects in OECD countries. Chapter 1 presents a comparative scoreboard of labour market performance that encompasses the quantity and quality of employment, as well as the inclusiveness of the labour market. During the past decade, most countries managed to better integrate women and potentially disadvantaged groups into the labour market and improve the quality of the working environment, whereas earnings quality was more or less stable and labour market security worsened. Chapter 2 looks at the resilience of labour markets following the global crisis and shows how both structural reforms and expansionary fiscal policy mitigate the unemployment costs of adverse aggregate shocks. OECD countries generally have avoided an increase in structural unemployment, but not a marked deceleration of wage and productivity growth. Chapter 3 documents the impact of technological progress and globalisation on OECD labour markets over the past two decades. Technology is shown to have been strongly associated with both job polarisation and de-industrialisation. The impact of trade integration is difficult to detect and probably small, although rising imports from China has a small effect in depressing employment in manufacturing. Chapter 4 provides an exceptionally rich portrait of collective bargaining in OECD countries that makes it possible to understand better how national systems differ and the implications of those differences for economic performance.

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  • 10-June-2017

    English

    Skills for jobs dataviz

    Skills for jobs

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  • 7-June-2017

    English

    High-Level Policy Forum on the New OECD Jobs Strategy

    The German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs and the OECD are jointly organising a High-Level Policy Forum on the New Jobs Strategy which will take place on 13 June 2017 in Berlin. The Forum will be hosted by Minister Andrea Nahles together with Secretary-General Angel Gurría.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English, PDF, 3,369kb

    Policy Brief on the Future of Work: Basic Income as a Policy Option

    Recent debates of Basic Income proposals shine a useful spotlight on the challenges that traditional forms of income support are increasingly facing, and highlight gaps in social provisions that largely depend on income or employment status. Reforms towards more universal income support would need to be introduced in stages, requiring a parallel debate on how to finance a more equal sharing of the benefits of economic growth.

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  • 10-April-2017

    English

    Financial Incentives for Steering Education and Training

    The present report examines how governments use financial incentives to promote a better alignment between labour market needs, on the one hand, and the supply of skills, on the other. In doing so, it identifies: i) innovative models that countries may be interested in learning from; ii) best practice in the design and use of financial incentives; iii) framework conditions for their effective use; and iv) limitations and risks in the use of financial incentives.

  • 6-April-2017

    English

    Back to Work: New Zealand - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is part of a series of reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that in New Zealand most displaced workers find a new job again, largely due to a strong economy and a highly flexible labour market. But many of them face large losses in terms of job quality and especially wages. And displaced workers facing difficulties in New Zealand are largely left on their own to find a new job, as the means-tested public benefit system only provides for people in need and employment services concentrate on helping people off benefit with limited focus on those not receiving a benefit.

    Nine countries are participating in the review: Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Japan,
    Korea, New Zealand, Sweden and the United States.

    Contents
    Chapter 1. Job displacement in New Zealand and its consequences
    Chapter 2 Easing the impact of economic restructuring on displaced workers in New Zealand
    Chapter 3 Re-employment support for displaced workers in New Zealand who struggle to find a new job

    www.oecd.org/employment/displaced-workers.htm

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