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  • 12-September-2017

    English

    Which careers do students go for? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Career decisions are wrought in complexities. Many students start by looking at their interests, selecting a career in line with their personal affinities or aspirations.

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  • 31-August-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 54 - Transition from school to work: How hard is it across different age groups?

    The transition from school to work can be a difficult period associated with spells of unemployment. Data show that those who leave school early have comparatively low skills and low educational attainment and face the greatest challenges in the labour market compared to their peers who stayed in education longer.

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  • 31-August-2017

    English

    What happens with your skills when you leave school? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Moving from the world of school to the world of work is one of the most dramatic changes in the lives of young people. And for many youngsters this transition does not go smoothly.

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  • 18-July-2017

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 74: How much of a problem is bullying at school?

    For the first time, the 2015 round of PISA collected data on students’ exposure to bullying. These data show that bullying is widespread. On average across OECD countries, around 11% of students reported that they are frequently (at least a few times per month) made fun of, 8% reported that they are frequently the object of nasty rumours in school, and 7% reported that they are frequently left out of things.

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  • 18-July-2017

    English

    Can bullying be stopped? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    The latest PISA in Focus tells some basic facts about bullying. First, bullying is widespread. Second, all types of students – boys and girls, rich and poor – face some risk of being bullied.

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  • 26-June-2017

    English

    Realising Slovenia’s bold vision for skills (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Small in size but not in its ambitions, Slovenia has a bold vision for a society in which people learn for and through life, are innovative, trust one another, enjoy a high quality of life and embrace their unique identity and culture.

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  • 23-June-2017

    English

    Skills and global value chains: A characterisation

    Combining OECD Survey of Adult Skills-based indicators with OECD Trade in Value Added (TiVA) data sheds light on the way skills and their distributions (at the country-industry level) relate to industry performance and to integration into global value chains. The results underline the importance of cognitive skills such as literacy, numeracy and problem solving for any industry to thrive in the global economy.

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  • 31-May-2017

    English

    Why are immigrants less proficient in literacy than native-born adults? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Why is it that even highly educated migrants to OECD countries are less likely to be employed than native-born adults who are similarly educated, even if the migrants have lived in their host country for several years?

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  • 15-May-2017

    English

    Who benefits when international students pay higher tuition fees? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    In 2014, over 3 million students in OECD countries – more than double the amount in 2000 – were studying outside their country of citizenship.

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  • 15-May-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 51 - Tuition fee reforms and international mobility

    In most countries with available data, public educational institutions charge different tuition fees for national and foreign students enrolled in the same programme. In Australia, Austria, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, foreign students pay on average about twice or more the tuition fees charged to national students.

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