Latest Documents


  • 5-October-2017

    English

    Closing Italy’s skills gap is everyone’s business Why innovation becomes imperative in education (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Closing Italy’s skills gap is everyone’s business Why innovation becomes imperative in education (OECD Education Today Blog)

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  • 29-September-2017

    English

    Building Skills for All in Australia - Policy Insights from the Survey of Adult Skills

    Australia’s overall performance in the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) ranges from average to very good. However, three million adults, representing one-fifth of the working age population, have low literacy and/or numeracy skills. Building Skills for All in Australia describes the characteristics of the low-skilled and discusses the consequences that low skills have on economic and social development for both individuals and Australian society. The review examines the strengths of the Australian skills system, highlighting the strong basic skills found in the migrant population, widespread proficiency in use of ICT and the positive role of workplaces in skills development. The study explores, moreover, the challenges facing the skills system and what can be done to enhance basic skills through education, training or other workplace measures. One of a series of studies on low basic skills, the review presents new analyses of PIAAC data and concludes with a series of policy recommendations. These include: increasing participation of women in STEM fields, addressing underperformance of post-secondary VET students and preventing drop-out, improving pre-apprenticeships, enhancing mathematics provision within secondary education and tackling poor access to childcare facilities for young mothers.

  • 13-September-2017

    English

    Archived webinar - Education at a Glance 2017 (with Andreas Schleicher, Director for the Directorate of Education and Skills, OECD)- September 12,2017

    Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators is the authoritative source for information on the state of education around the world.

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  • 12-September-2017

    English

    Which careers do students go for? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Career decisions are wrought in complexities. Many students start by looking at their interests, selecting a career in line with their personal affinities or aspirations.

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  • 12-September-2017

    English

    Education at a Glance 2017 - OECD Indicators

    Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators is the authoritative source for information on the state of education around the world. With more than 125 charts and 145 tables included in the publication and much more data available on the educational database, Education at a Glance 2017 provides key information on the output of educational institutions; the impact of learning across countries; the financial and human resources invested in education; access, participation and progression in education; and the learning environment and organisation of schools.

    The 2017 edition presents a new focus on fields of study, investigating both trends in enrolment at upper secondary and tertiary level, student mobility, and labour market outcomes of the qualifications obtained in these fields. The publication also introduces for the first time a full chapter dedicated to the Sustainable Development Goals, providing an assessment of where OECD and partner countries stand on their way to meeting the SDG targets. Finally, two new indicators are developed and analysed in the context of participation and progress in education: an indicator on the completion rate of upper secondary students and an indicator on admission processes to higher education.

    The report covers all 35 OECD countries and a number of partner countries (Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Lithuania, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia and South Africa).

    The Excel™ spreadsheets used to create the tables and charts in Education at a Glance are available via the StatLinks provided throughout the publication.

  • 31-August-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 54 - Transition from school to work: How hard is it across different age groups?

    The transition from school to work can be a difficult period associated with spells of unemployment. Data show that those who leave school early have comparatively low skills and low educational attainment and face the greatest challenges in the labour market compared to their peers who stayed in education longer.

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  • 31-August-2017

    English

    What happens with your skills when you leave school? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Moving from the world of school to the world of work is one of the most dramatic changes in the lives of young people. And for many youngsters this transition does not go smoothly.

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  • 18-July-2017

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 74: How much of a problem is bullying at school?

    For the first time, the 2015 round of PISA collected data on students’ exposure to bullying. These data show that bullying is widespread. On average across OECD countries, around 11% of students reported that they are frequently (at least a few times per month) made fun of, 8% reported that they are frequently the object of nasty rumours in school, and 7% reported that they are frequently left out of things.

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  • 18-July-2017

    English

    Can bullying be stopped? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    The latest PISA in Focus tells some basic facts about bullying. First, bullying is widespread. Second, all types of students – boys and girls, rich and poor – face some risk of being bullied.

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  • 26-June-2017

    English

    Realising Slovenia’s bold vision for skills (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Small in size but not in its ambitions, Slovenia has a bold vision for a society in which people learn for and through life, are innovative, trust one another, enjoy a high quality of life and embrace their unique identity and culture.

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