Share

Reports


  • 22-February-2021

    English

    Creating Responsive Adult Learning Opportunities in Japan

    The COVID-19 crisis has reiterated the importance of adult learning and career guidance services as many adults have lost their jobs and now require upskilling and reskilling opportunities in order to keep pace with the rapidly evolving world of work. To foster the development of responsive and more widespread adult learning opportunities in Japan, this report analyses several policy options to expand access to training, remove the barriers to training participation, and ensure that the training provided is aligned with Japan’s labour market needs. It also discusses the importance for Japanese workers of receiving guidance and support from their employer to facilitate career progression and the need for externally provided guidance services for workers who want to change jobs. Based on this analysis, this report provides actionable policy recommendations as well as good practice examples from OECD countries.
  • 11-February-2021

    English

    Improving the Quality of Non-Formal Adult Learning - Learning from European Best Practices on Quality Assurance

    The COVID-19 crisis has reiterated the importance of adult learning and career guidance services as many adults have lost their jobs and now require upskilling and reskilling opportunities in order to keep pace with the rapidly evolving world of work. Yet, in order to achieve its positive gains, adult training needs to be of high quality and ensure successful learning experiences for all participants. This report therefore aims at supporting public authorities to enhance quality in the field of non-formal adult learning. It provides an overview of quality assurance systems across Europe, highlighting their implementation features, governance structures and success factors. Based on this analysis, the report develops a Quality Assurance in Adult Learning Decision Tree to support the decision-making process of governments that are planning reforms of their quality assurance systems.
  • 10-February-2021

    English

    Going Digital in Latvia

    Going Digital in Latvia analyses recent developments in Latvia’s digital economy, reviews policies related to digitalisation and make recommendations to increase policy coherence in this area, based on the OECD Going Digital Integrated Policy Framework. The review uses strategic foresight to explore three alternative future scenarios, which could result from the digital transformation of the global economy and society. It also examines the availability and quality of communication networks and services in Latvia as well as related policies and regulations. Further, it reviews trends in digital technology usage among individuals, businesses and the government, and examines policies to foster diffusion. Finally, the review analyses opportunities and challenges raised by digitalisation in key areas, from innovation and skills to digital security and data governance, and evaluates policy responses to these changes in Latvia.
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 2-February-2021

    English

    Positive, High-achieving Students? - What Schools and Teachers Can Do

    The work of teachers matters in many different ways. Not only do they provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to thrive in the labour market, but they also help develop the social-emotional skills that are vital for students’ personal development and for their active citizenship. But how do teachers best achieve this? By linking 2018 data from the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) with evidence from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) – known as the TALIS-PISA link – this report aims to identify the teacher and school factors that matter most for student achievement and social-emotional development. The report uses a data-driven approach – based on machine learning and standard regression analyses – to identify the dimensions that are most strongly linked with student outcomes, and then combines this with a careful review of theory and previous research to analyse and interpret the findings. These findings provide a rich illustration of the many ways in which teachers and school leaders might influence the success of their students, acting as a tool for educators to reflect upon their own practice. Finally, the report offers several directions for education policy.
  • 26-January-2021

    English

    Career Guidance for Adults in a Changing World of Work

    Career guidance is a fundamental policy lever to help adults successfully navigate a constantly evolving labour market through advice and information on job and training opportunities. The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the importance of career guidance services. Many adults have lost their jobs and require assistance navigating their career options in a changing labour market, where firms are likely to accelerate the adoption of digital technologies in the name of pandemic-proofing. But compared to career guidance services for youth, services for adults receive relatively little policy attention, and little is known of how often existing services are used. This report scopes out initiatives in the area of career guidance for adults in OECD countries, drawing lessons on how to strengthen adult career guidance systems in terms of coverage and inclusiveness, provision and service delivery, quality and impact, and governance and funding. The findings of the report build on the information collected through the 2020 Survey of Career Guidance for Adults (SCGA), an online survey of adults’ experience with career guidance.
  • 22-January-2021

    English

    A deep look into teaching - Findings from the Global Teaching InSights video study

    Around the world, researchers, policy makers, parents and children all agree that teachers matter to student outcomes. However, we are only beginning to understand what makes a difference in terms of quality teaching. Teaching and learning are complex processes that challenge the skills and abilities of both teachers and learners. Teachers must know how, when, where and why to use specific teaching practices related to the subject matter to meet learners’ needs and move them forward. The OECD’s Global Teaching InSights: A Video Study of Teaching uses new research methods to shed light more directly on teaching and learning processes, which are key to improving education at scale.
  • 21-January-2021

    English

    Making the most of teachers’ time

    Teachers’ time is a critical resource for education systems and a key input for student learning. Like any type of resource, teachers’ time can be allocated more or less effectively to promote positive outcomes for students. How school systems regulate teachers’ working time reflects diverse conceptions of the role of teachers and different strategies for making the most of their time. The COVID‑19 pandemic and the rise of remote and hybrid teaching environments in 2020 have further increased the complexity and diversity of tasks that compete for teachers’ time. The pandemic context has also tested the capacity of school systems to adapt provisions for teachers’ use of time quickly in response to changing conditions. Building on the findings from the OECD School Resources Review series and data from the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS), this Policy Brief presents policies and practices that can promote an effective use of teachers’ time by exploring the following questions: What do we know about teachers’ effective use of time? How to balance regulations and flexibility to encourage an effective use of time? How to define core tasks and support teachers in prioritising them? Can technology help teachers use their time more effectively?
  • 19-January-2021

    English

    Africa’s Development Dynamics 2021 - Digital Transformation for Quality Jobs

    Africa’s Development Dynamics uses lessons learned in the continent’s five regions – Central, East, North, Southern and West Africa – to develop policy recommendations and share good practices. Drawing on the most recent statistics, this analysis of development dynamics attempts to help African leaders reach the targets of the African Union’s Agenda 2063 at all levels: continental, regional, national and local. The 2021 edition, now published at the beginning of the year, explores how digitalisation can create quality jobs and contribute to achieving Agenda 2063, thereby making African economies more resilient to the global recession triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. The report targets four main policy areas for Africa’s digital transformation: bridging the digital divide; supporting local innovation; empowering own-account workers; and harmonising, implementing and monitoring digital strategies. This edition includes a new chapter examining how to finance Africa’s development despite the 2020 global economic crisis. Africa’s Development Dynamics feeds into a policy debate between the African Union’s governments, citizens, entrepreneurs and researchers. It aims to be part of a new collaboration between countries and regions, which focuses on mutual learning and the preservation of common goods. This report results from a partnership between the African Union Commission and the OECD Development Centre.
  • 18-January-2021

    English

    How does earnings advantage from tertiary education vary by field of study?

    A tertiary degree yields better earnings, especially in countries with a small share of tertiary-educated adults in the population. However, this earnings advantage varies significantly by field of study. In some countries, workers with a tertiary degree in arts and humanities earn less than those with just an upper secondary education. Occupations that have formed the backbone of society during the COVID-19 crisis, such as education and nursing, have among the lowest relative earnings of all fields of study. There is no clear correlation between the share of tertiary graduates by field of study and the relative earnings advantage. This may be due to the selectiveness of some fields, students’ personal interests or misinformation about the labour market. Policy makers will need to consider ways beyond market mechanisms to increase the attractiveness of fields of study which offer essential skills for society.
  • 18-January-2021

    English

    Not enough hours in the day - Policies that shape teachers’ use of time

    Teachers’ time is a critical resource for education systems and a key input for student learning. Like any type of resource, teachers’ time can be used more or less effectively to promote a range of outcomes such as student learning, equity and well-being. Whether teachers are given an additional hour in the classroom, an hour to prepare their lessons or an hour to engage in professional learning can affect both the cost and the quality of education. Based on OECD survey data and indicators, this paper provides a systematic overview of how teachers across the OECD report using their time and how their time use is regulated in national policy frameworks. Building on the findings from the OECD School Resources Review series, the paper then explores human resource policies that can support education stakeholders in rethinking priorities, roles and responsibilities in school education and promote an effective use of teachers’ time.
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>