Best Practices / Guidelines


  • 27-April-2016

    English

    Adult Skills in Focus No. 3 - What does age have to do with skills proficiency?

    The Survey of Adult Skills finds that adults aged 55 to 65 are less proficient in literacy and numeracy than adults aged 25 to 34. But differences in skills proficiency that are related to age vary widely across countries, implying that skills policies can affect the evolution of proficiency over a lifetime.

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  • 27-April-2016

    English

    Going grey, staying skilled (OECD Education&Skills Today Blog)

    Increased life expectancy represents one of the great achievements of modern societies: living longer and better has been a dream of past generations. At the same time, it implies changes to many aspects of life.

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  • 22-April-2016

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 40 - Teachers’ ICT and problem-solving skills: Competencies and needs

    The education sector performs well for information and communication technology (ICT) and problem-solving skills, although it still lags behind the professional, scientific and technical activities sector.

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  • 14-April-2016

    English

    Adult Skills in Focus No. 2: What does low proficiency in literacy really mean?

    The Survey of Adult Skills finds that even adults with the lowest proficiency in literacy possess some basic reading skills, although the level of these skills varies considerably across countries.

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  • 9-March-2016

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 39 - The internationalisation of doctoral and master's studies

    One in ten students at the master’s or equivalent level is an international student in OECD countries, rising to one in four at the doctoral level.

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  • 16-February-2016

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 38 - How is learning time organised in primary and secondary education?

    The number and length of school holidays differs significantly across OECD countries, meaning the number of instructional days in primary and secondary education ranges from 162 days a year in France to more than 200 days in Israel and Japan.

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  • 12-January-2016

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 59 - Does it matter how much time students spend on line outside of school?

    In 2012, 15-year-old students spent over two hours on line each day, on average across OECD countries. The most common online activities among 15-year-olds were browsing the Internet for fun and participating in social networks, with over 70% of students doing one of these every day or almost every day.

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  • 8-January-2016

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 37 - Who are the bachelor’s and master’s graduates?

    Graduation rates for bachelor’s and master’s degrees have dramatically increased over the past two decades, with 6 million bachelor’s degrees and 3 million master’s degrees awarded in OECD countries in 2013. Although women represent over half of the graduates at the bachelor’s and master’s level, they are still strikingly under-represented in the fields of sciences and engineering.

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  • 10-December-2015

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 58 - Who wants to become a teacher?

    Across OECD countries, 5% of students expect to work as teachers: 3% of boys and 6% of girls. The academic profile of students who expect to work as teachers varies, but in many OECD countries, students who expect to work as teachers have poorer mathematics and reading skills than other ambitious students who expect to work as professionals but not as teachers.

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  • 17-November-2015

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 57 - Can schools help to integrate immigrants?

    Only in some countries is a larger proportion of immigrant students in schools related to lower student performance – and this relationship is mostly explained by the concentration of disadvantaged students in these schools.

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