Articles


  • 1-February-2018

    English

    Learning for careers: The career pathways movement in the United States (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Learning needs vary as we evolve through life. The early years of education set the stage for children’s well-being, cognitive and social-emotional development; young children starting out in the world require stability, reassurance, and encouragement, and need a warm and caring teacher.

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  • 31-January-2018

    English

    Shaping, not predicting, the future of students (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Footballer Cristiano Ronaldo is reputed to have once said that there’s no point making predictions because nothing is set in stone. It is hard to predict the future, but in education policy at least it is not altogether impossible.

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  • 29-January-2018

    English

    Learning for careers: The career pathways movement in the United States (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Digitisation is expected to profoundly change the way we learn and work – at a faster pace than previous major drivers of transformation. Many children entering school today are likely to end up working in jobs that do not yet exist.

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  • 22-January-2018

    English

    Teaching for Global Competence in a Rapidly Changing World

    This new publication sets forward the PISA framework for global competence developed by the OECD, which aligns closely with the definition developed by the Center for Global Education at Asia Society.

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  • 22-January-2018

    English

    How to prepare students for the complexity of a global society (OECD Education Today Blog)

    The world’s growing complexity and diversity present both opportunity and challenge. On the one hand, globalization can bring important new perspectives, innovation, and improved living standards. But on the other, it can also contribute to economic inequality, social division, and conflict.

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  • 21-December-2017

    English

    What the expansion of higher education means for graduates in the labour market (OECD Education Today Blog)

    A university degree has always been considered as key to a good job and higher wages. But as the share of tertiary-educated adults across OECD countries has almost doubled over the last two decades, can the labour market absorb this growing supply of skills?

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  • 19-December-2017

    English

    Busting the myth about standardised testing (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Standardised testing has received a bad rap in recent years. Parents and educators argue that too much testing can make students anxious without improving their learning.

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  • 15-December-2017

    English

    Citizenship and education in a digital world (OECD Education Today Blog)

    "Everyone believes in the atrocities of the enemy and disbelieves in those of his own side, without ever bothering to examine the evidence”, George Orwell wrote in 1943. And in an era of ‘fake news’ and post-truth, it resembles our world today.

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  • 12-December-2017

    English

    Educating our youth to care about each other and the world (OECD Education Today Blog)

    In 2015, 193 countries committed to achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations, a shared vision of humanity that provides the missing piece of the globalisation puzzle. The extent to which that vision becomes a reality will in no small way depend on what is happening in today’s classrooms. Indeed, it is educators who hold the key to ensuring that the SDGs become a real social contract with citizens.

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  • 6-December-2017

    English

    How can countries close the equity gap in education? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Education plays a dual role when it comes to social inequality and social mobility. It is the main way for societies to foster equality of opportunity and support upward social mobility for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. But the evidence is overwhelming that education often reproduces social divides in societies, through the impact that parents’ economic, social and cultural status has on children’s learning outcomes.

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