Publications & Documents


  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Mexico 2017

    Skills are central to Mexico’s future prosperity and the well-being of its people. Improving opportunities for all Mexicans to develop high quality and relevant skills and supporting employers to improve their human resources management can help Mexico to raise productivity levels and, by extension, the incentives for employers to hire individuals in the formal sector. Fostering better and more equitable skills outcomes, especially for women and youth, will also provide the foundation for building a healthier, more equitable, and more cohesive society.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Mexico sets out eight skills challenges for Mexico. These challenges were identified through two interactive workshops with stakeholders, bilateral meetings, internal discussions with experts at the OECD, and analysis of documents and data produced by the OECD and other organisations. The first six challenges refer to specific outcomes across the three pillars of developing, activating and using skills. The next two challenges refer to the 'enabling' conditions that strengthen the overall skills system. Success in tackling these skills challenges will boost performance across the whole skills system.
  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: The Netherlands 2017

    The Netherlands today is prosperous, but its future success is not assured.  The Netherlands owes its success in no small part to actions it has taken in the past to develop a highly skilled population. Given the profound economic and social transformation that the Netherlands is currently undergoing, skills will be even more important for success in the future.  The Dutch education system and the skills of the Dutch population are strong overall. Therefore many of the opportunities for further improving the skills outcomes of the Netherlands are to be found in areas of society where the government has more limited influence, such as the workplace and community. As a consequence, achieving the Netherlands’ skills ambitions will require a whole-of-society approach.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Netherlands identifies the following three skills priorities for the Netherlands - fostering more equitable skills outcomes, creating skills-intensive workplaces, and promoting a learning culture. These priorities were identified through the analysis of common themes that emerged from stakeholder perspectives on the most important skills challenges facing the Netherlands, and through the OECD’s analysis of the nine skills challenges identified and examined in the report.
  • 30-November-2017

    English

    TopClass Podcast Episode 1: What is ‘neurodiversity’ in the classroom and how should we respond to it?

    Not every student’s brain works and learns in the same way. Classrooms are increasingly becoming more aware of what is known as "neurodiversity" among their students, a term used to describe neurodevelopmental disorders such as ADHD and ASD.

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  • 30-November-2017

    English

    TopClass Podcast Episode 2: Listen to the teacher! The Teaching and Learning International Survey

    The Teaching and Learning International Survey (otherwise known as TALIS) is a survey conducted every five years that asks teachers and school leaders from around the world about the working conditions and the learning environment in their schools.

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  • 30-November-2017

    English

    TopClass Podcast Episode 3: What collaborative problem solving can tell us about students' social skills

    Do today’s students really know how to work well together? For the first time ever, the Programme for International Student Assessment 2015 (otherwise known as PISA) examined students’ ability to collaborate to solve problems and the necessary social skills involved in that process.

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  • 30-November-2017

    English

    Education in Chile

    Chile’s education system can foster stronger economic, democratic and social development in the country. There are significant macroeconomic benefits to education, such as increased productivity. That said, individuals tend to benefit the most from high-quality, equitable education systems.In 2004, the OECD performed a review of national education policies and an analysis of the Chilean education system. This review aims to identify key changes in the Chilean education system mainly from 2004-16, in order to analyse where education in Chile stands today and offer recommendations to help provide better education opportunities for all Chileans in the coming years. The review therefore examines different areas of education policy in Chile, from early childhood education and care (ECEC) to higher education.
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  • 29-November-2017

    English

    The quantification of structural reforms: extending the framework to emerging market economies

    This paper estimates and quantifies the impact of structural reforms on per capita income for a large set of OECD and non-OECD countries.

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  • 29-November-2017

    English

    Aggregate multi-factor productivity: measurement issues in OECD countries

    This paper analyses for 34 OECD countries the extent to which the calculation of aggregate multi-factor productivity (MFP) is sensitive to alternative parameterisations.

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  • 29-November-2017

    English

    Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education in Hungary

    This report presents evidence-based analysis of current strategies and practices in higher education institutions (HEIs) in Hungary towards a value-creating use of knowledge resources for innovation and entrepreneurship. The analysis and recommendations are highly relevant for policy makers and HEI leaders in other countries. Increased attention to innovation and entrepreneurship both from public policy actors and HEI leadership has triggered an incremental change process in the organisational culture of HEIs and a new approach to education and research for students and staff. HEInnovate is a joint initiative of the European Commission and the OECD to promote the innovative and entrepreneurial higher education institution across Europe and beyond (www.heinnovate.eu).
  • 27-November-2017

    English

    Labour market and collective bargaining in Iceland: sharing the spoils without spoiling the shares

    Iceland has high living standards, low poverty, high inclusiveness and one of the most sustainable pension systems.

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