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  • 14-September-2020

    English, PDF, 852kb

    TALIS 2018 Country Note Volume II - Georgia

    The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) is an international, large-scale survey of teachers, school leaders and the learning environment in schools. This note presents findings based on the reports of lower secondary teachers and their school leaders in mainstream public and private schools.

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  • 14-September-2020

    English

    Improving evidence on VET - Comparative data and indicators

    The international landscape of vocational education and training (VET) is hugely diverse – and more diverse than most other sectors of education systems. There is wide variation across countries in how vocational programmes are organised and delivered, the ages and stages of education at which individuals pursue VET and how VET is funded. This diversity creates an opportunity to exploit cross-country variation to identify the features of VET systems associated with better educational, labour market and social outcomes for graduates. At the same time, country comparisons need good data, but comparative data on VET have major gaps. This report identifies existing and new indicators of VET systems that are suitable for international comparisons, based on current data availability and quality. The report does not directly fill those data gaps, but establishes the dimensions of the gaps and sets out how one might go about filling them, while giving some proposals for future indicator development.
  • 11-September-2020

    Russian, PDF, 1,634kb

    TALIS 2018 Country Note Volume II - Russian Federation (Russian)

    The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) is an international, large-scale survey of teachers, school leaders and the learning environment in schools. This note presents findings based on the reports of lower secondary teachers and their school leaders in mainstream public and private schools.

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  • 10-September-2020

    English, PDF, 858kb

    TALIS 2018 Country Note Volume II - Italy

    The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) is an international, large-scale survey of teachers, school leaders and the learning environment in schools. This note presents findings based on the reports of lower secondary teachers and their school leaders in mainstream public and private schools.

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  • 10-September-2020

    English

    The economic impacts of learning losses

    The worldwide school closures in early 2020 led to losses in learning that will not easily be made up for even if schools quickly return to their prior performance levels. These losses will have lasting economic impacts both on the affected students and on each nation unless they are effectively remediated. While the precise learning losses are not yet known, existing research suggests that the students in grades 1-12 affected by the closures might expect some 3 percent lower income over their entire lifetimes. For nations, the lower long-term growth related to such losses might yield an average of 1.5 percent lower annual GDP for the remainder of the century. These economic losses would grow if schools are unable to re-start quickly. The economic losses will be more deeply felt by disadvantaged students. All indications are that students whose families are less able to support out-of-school learning will face larger learning losses than their more advantaged peers, which in turn will translate into deeper losses of lifetime earnings. The present value of the economic losses to nations reach huge proportions. Just returning schools to where they were in 2019 will not avoid such losses. Only making them better can. While a variety of approaches might be attempted, existing research indicates that close attention to the modified re-opening of schools offers strategies that could ameliorate the losses. Specifically, with the expected increase in video-based instruction, matching the skills of the teaching force to the new range of tasks and activities could quickly move schools to heightened performance. Additionally, because the prior disruptions are likely to increase the variations in learning levels within individual classrooms, pivoting to more individualised instruction could leave all students better off as schools resume. As schools move to re-establish their programmes even as the pandemic continues, it is natural to focus considerable attention on the mechanics and logistics of safe re-opening. But the long-term economic impacts also require serious attention, because the losses already suffered demand more than the best of currently considered re-opening approaches.
  • 8-September-2020

    English

    Education critical to build a more resilient society

    The COVID-19 crisis has exposed the many inadequacies and inequities in education systems around the world. As governments start rebuilding their economies and people’s livelihoods, it is critical that long-term public spending on education remain a priority to ensure that every young person has the same opportunity to continue education, succeed at school and develop the skills they need to contribute to society.

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  • 8-September-2020

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, launching the 2020 OECD report Education at a Glance, 8 September 2020

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, launched the 2020 OECD report Education at a Glance on Tuesday 8 September 2020.

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  • 1-September-2020

    English

    Generation Unlimited: Connecting Half the World to Opportunities

    The COVID-19 crisis has transformed remote learning into a crucial element for continuing education. Home has become the learning place, while an internet connection is a lifeline for students.

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  • 1-September-2020

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, speaking as the global board member of the Generation Unlimited, 1st September 2020

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, spoke in support of the Generation Unlimited: Connecting Half the World to Opportunities, on 1st September 2020.

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  • 27-August-2020

    English

    How are young graduates settling into the labour market?

    The transition from tertiary education to work involves substantial uncertainty and changes between education programmes, jobs and industries. The current major disruption in the labour market is only going to increase this uncertainty, making it essential for graduates to be prepared for it. Graduates with more dynamic career trajectories are more likely to include interpersonal skills in their professional profiles. This confirms the need for higher education institutions to pursue their efforts to develop a comprehensive skill set for their graduates, including technical skills and also interpersonal skills.
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