Publications & Documents


  • 12-September-2017

    English

    Benefits of university education remain high but vary widely across fields of study

    Tertiary enrolment is expanding rapidly, with very strong returns for individuals and taxpayers, but new evidence shows that universities can fail to offer, and individuals fail to pursue, the fields of study that promise the greatest labour-market opportunities, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 12-September-2017

    English

    Education at a Glance 2017 - OECD Indicators

    Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators is the authoritative source for information on the state of education around the world. With more than 125 charts and 145 tables included in the publication and much more data available on the educational database, Education at a Glance 2017 provides key information on the output of educational institutions; the impact of learning across countries; the financial and human resources invested in education; access, participation and progression in education; and the learning environment and organisation of schools.

    The 2017 edition presents a new focus on fields of study, investigating both trends in enrolment at upper secondary and tertiary level, student mobility, and labour market outcomes of the qualifications obtained in these fields. The publication also introduces for the first time a full chapter dedicated to the Sustainable Development Goals, providing an assessment of where OECD and partner countries stand on their way to meeting the SDG targets. Finally, two new indicators are developed and analysed in the context of participation and progress in education: an indicator on the completion rate of upper secondary students and an indicator on admission processes to higher education.

    The report covers all 35 OECD countries and a number of partner countries (Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Lithuania, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia and South Africa).

    The Excel™ spreadsheets used to create the tables and charts in Education at a Glance are available via the StatLinks provided throughout the publication.

  • 12-September-2017

    English

    OECD Handbook for Internationally Comparative Education Statistics - Concepts, Standards, Definitions and Classifications

    For well over two decades, the OECD has developed and published a broad range of comparative indicators published yearly in the flagship publication Education at a Glance. These provide insights into the functioning of education systems, such as the participation and progress through education, the human and financial resources invested, and the economic and social outcomes associated with educational attainment. Through the set of harmonised indicators and definitions, they enable countries to view their education system in the light of other countries’ performance, practices, and resources.

    Fundamental to the credibility and understanding of these comparisons are the concepts, definitions, classifications and methodologies that have been developed over the years to underpin the statistics and indicators. This Handbook draws these methodologies together in a single reference volume, complementing and providing an invaluable aid to  users of  Education at a Glance. In doing so, the Handbook aims to facilitate a greater understanding of the education statistics and indicators produced and so allow for their more effective use in policy analysis. Equally, it provides a ready reference of international standards and conventions for others to follow in the collection and assimilation of educational data.

    This edition updates the OECD Handbook for Internationally Comparative Education Statistics, last published in May 2004.

  • 4-September-2017

    English

    Labour market resilience: the role of structural and macroeconomic policies

    This paper provides an overview of labour market resilience in the wake of the Great Recession of 2008-09 and the role played by macroeconomic and structural policies.

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  • 4-September-2017

    English

    Awarding – and imagining – teaching excellence (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Tertiary qualifications have become the entrance ticket for modern societies. Never before have those with advanced qualifications had the life chances they enjoy today, and never before have those who struggled to acquire a good education paid the price they pay today.

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  • 1-September-2017

    English

    Education and Skills Newsletter - July/August 2017

    What's new in education and skills at the OECD?

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  • 31-August-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 54 - Transition from school to work: How hard is it across different age groups?

    The transition from school to work can be a difficult period associated with spells of unemployment. Data show that those who leave school early have comparatively low skills and low educational attainment and face the greatest challenges in the labour market compared to their peers who stayed in education longer.

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  • 31-August-2017

    English

    What happens with your skills when you leave school? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Moving from the world of school to the world of work is one of the most dramatic changes in the lives of young people. And for many youngsters this transition does not go smoothly.

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  • 31-August-2017

    English

    PISA 2015 Assessment and Analytical Framework - Science, Reading, Mathematic, Financial Literacy and Collaborative Problem Solving

    What is important for citizens to know and be able to do? The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) seeks to answer that question through the most comprehensive and rigorous international assessment of student knowledge and skills. The PISA 2015 Assessment and Analytical Framework presents the conceptual foundations of the sixth cycle of the triennial assessment. This revised edition includes the framework for collaborative problem solving, which was evaluated for the first time, in an optional assessment, in PISA 2015.

    As in previous cycles, the 2015 assessment covers science, reading and mathematics, with the major focus in this cycle on scientific literacy. Financial literacy is an optional assessment, as it was in 2012. A questionnaire about students’ background is distributed to all participating students. Students may also choose to complete additional questionnaires: one about their future studies/career, a second about their familiarity with information and communication technologies. School principals complete a questionnaire about the learning environment in their schools, and parents of students who sit the PISA test can choose to complete a questionnaire about the home environment. Seventy-one countries and economies, including all 35 OECD countries, participated in the PISA 2015 assessment.

  • 29-August-2017

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 75 - Does the quality of learning outcomes fall when education expands to include more disadvantaged students?

    Globally, enrolment in secondary education has expanded dramatically over the past decades. This expansion is also reflected in PISA data, particularly for low- and middle-income countries. Between 2003 and 2015, Indonesia added more than 1.1 million students, Turkey and Brazil more than 400 000 students, and Mexico more than 300 000 students, to the total population of 15-year-olds eligible to participate in PISA.

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