Publications & Documents


  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Chile

    This study analyses the relationship between skills and labour market outcomes in Chile with a specific focus on disadvantaged groups: youth, women and the low-skilled. It examines the proficiency of the Chilean population in literacy, numeracy and problem solving in a technological-rich environment and disentangles the relationship between proficiency and labour market outcomes in Chile. The study also devotes significant attention to the demand for skills, by describing the use of skills at work in Chile and identifying its key determinants, as well as assessing the extent of skills mismatch and its implications for individuals. Throughout the study, differences between sociodemographic groups are highlighted to investigate the roots of labour market disadvantage.
  • 2-April-2018

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Italy 2017

    Italy needs to take prompt action to bolster growth and improve people’s skills across the country. As our economies adapt to globalisation, technological and demographic change, the demand for new and higher levels of skills increases. Yet Italy is struggling more than other advanced economies to meet these changing demands. Italy has launched a number of ambitious reforms to boost growth. But the reforms need to fully implement to ensure that schools, universities and workplaces equip all Italians with the skills needed for success in the economy and society.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report makes a number of recommendations that will help sustain this positive momentum including, among others, to:
    • Implement the Alternanza Scuola Lavoro (ASL) by training school principals and teachers to effectively engage employers in the design of work-based learning activities and increase incentives for firms to hire trainees.
    • Expand and improve the quality of professional tertiary education institutions (ITS).
    • Increase overall investment in tertiary education
    • Subsidise training programmes that target low-skilled adults who often face difficulties in accessing such opportunities.
    • Increase public and private investment in skills and improve how they are allocated through monitoring and evaluation.
    • Improve the governance system to ensure that skills polices are aligned and coordinated.
  • 29-March-2018

    English, PDF, 1,599kb

    Education Policy Outlook: Mexico 2018

    This policy profile is part of the Education Policy Outlook series, which presents comparative analysis of education policies and reforms across OECD countries.

    Related Documents
  • 27-March-2018

    English

    Engaging Young Children - Lessons from Research about Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care

    The first years of life lay the foundations for a child’s future development and learning. Many countries have increased their financial support for provision of early childhood education and care (ECEC) over the past years. More recently, the focus of debate has been shifting from expanding access to affordable ECEC to enhancing its quality.  A growing body of research suggests that the magnitude of the benefits for children will depend on the level of quality of early childhood services, with especially strong evidence in the case of disadvantaged children.In light of budgetary constraints, policy makers require the latest knowledge base of the quality dimensions that are most important for ensuring children's development and early learning. However, current research is often narrow in focus or limited to programme-level or national-level conclusions. This book expands the knowledge base on this topic. It draws lessons from a cross-national literature review and meta-analysis of the relationship between early childhood education and care structure (e.g. child-staff ratios, staff training and qualifications), process quality (i.e. the quality of staff-child interactions and developmental activities), and links to child development and learning.This report concludes with key insights, as well as avenues for further research. It was co-funded by the European Union.
  • 23-March-2018

    English, PDF, 1,444kb

    Starting Strong V: Transition from Early Childhood Education and Care to Primary Education – Background report – Japan

    The transition from early childhood education to primary school is a big step for all children, and a step which more and more children are having to take. Quality transitions should be well-prepared and child-centred, managed by trained staff collaborating with one another, and guided by an appropriate and aligned curriculum.

    Related Documents
  • 20-March-2018

    English

    Teaching for the Future - Effective Classroom Practices To Transform Education

    Teachers are the most important school-related factor influencing student learning. Teachers can help level the playing field and provide opportunities for success to all their students. They can inspire students to innovate; to think and reflect and to work in collaboration with others. Good teachers can also stimulate and guide students' development so that their achievements go beyond their own expectations. Therefore, how teachers achieve this in the classroom is important to understand. Teaching for the Future: Effective Classroom Practices To Transform Education links research and data on key issues facing teachers today with teachers’ own experiences to overcome challenges and create an effective classroom. This report builds on the discussions and stories shared at the Qudwa Global Teachers’ Forum, organised by the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi on 7-8 October 2017. It captures the efforts made by teachers, from across the world, to facilitate student learning and transform education to build a fairer, humane and inclusive world. The report provides an in-depth analysis of issues that teachers encounter in their day-to-day professional life, particularly those around equity and reducing personal and social disadvantage, building academic, social and emotional well-being of students through parental engagement and integrating information and communication technology in classrooms.
  • 19-March-2018

    English

    More efforts needed to help immigrant students succeed at school and in society

    Socio-economic disadvantage and language barriers are the biggest obstacles to success at school and in society for students with an immigrant background. More effective and better targeted education and social policies are needed to help migrant children integrate and fulfil their potential, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 19-March-2018

    English

    The Resilience of Students with an Immigrant Background - Factors that Shape Well-being

    Migration flows are profoundly changing the composition of classrooms. Results from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) reveal that in 2015, almost one in four 15-year-old students in OECD countries reported that they were either foreign-born or had at least one foreign-born parent. Between 2003 and 2015, the share of students who had either migrated or who had a parent who had migrated across international borders grew by six percentage points, on average across OECD countries.The Resilience of Students with an Immigrant Background: Factors that Shape Well-being reveals some of the difficulties students with an immigrant background encounter and where they receive the support they need. The report provides an in-depth analysis of the risk and protective factors that can undermine or promote the resilience of immigrant students. It explores the role that education systems, schools and teachers can play in helping these students integrate into their communities, overcome adversity, and build their academic, social, emotional and motivational resilience.
  • 15-March-2018

    English

    Valuing our Teachers and Raising their Status - How Communities Can Help

    There is increasing recognition that teachers will play a key role in preparing students for the challenges of the future. We expect teachers to equip students with the skill set and knowledge required for success in an increasingly global, digital, complex, uncertain and volatile world. This will involve teachers and schools forging stronger links with parents and local communities, building a sense of social responsibility and problem solving skills among their students. It also means that teachers need to adopt effective and individualised pedagogies that foster student learning and nurture their social and emotional skills. How can education systems help them engage in continuous innovation and professional development to enhance their own practice?This report shows how education systems can support teachers to meet these new demands and encourage a paradigm shift on what teaching and learning are about and how they should happen. Education systems need to create the conditions that encourage and enable innovation. They need to promote best practice through policies focused on professionalism, efficacy and effectiveness in order to help build teachers’ capacity for adopting new pedagogies. Due attention should also be paid to teachers’ sense of well-being so that classroom learning environments remain conducive to students’ own well-being and development.
  • 2-March-2018

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Vienna on 5-6 March 2018

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Vienna on 5-6 March 2018, to visit the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), where he will meet with IIASA Senior Management as well as with researchers from Mexico.

    Related Documents
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>