Publications & Documents


  • 25-August-2015

    English

    (Learning) time is on their side (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Got a minute? How about 218 of them? That’s the average amount of time students in OECD countries spend in mathematics class each week (although to some, it feels like an eternity). Spare a thought, though, for students in Chile: they spend about twice that amount of time (400 minutes, or 6 hours and 40 minutes) each week in maths class. But who’s counting?

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  • 25-August-2015

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 54 - Is spending more hours in class better for learning?

    There is no real consensus on how much class time is enough when it comes to learning mathematics, science and reading. But educators and policy makers generally agree that while it’s important for students to spend considerable time in school lessons to acquire new skills, spending more hours and minutes in class is not enough to ensure that students succeed in school.

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  • 21-August-2015

    English

    Denmark: Still worth getting to (OECD Education Today Blog)

    An open, liberal economy combined with redistribution and social welfare: The Danish model has largely weathered the storm of the financial and euro crises. Yet, when looking at education and integration, not all is rosy in the Kingdom of Denmark.

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  • 19-August-2015

    English

    Too small to “productively” use skills at work?

    Human capital is key for economic growth. Not only is it linked to aggregate economic performance but also to each individual’s labour market outcomes. However, a skilled population is not enough to achieve high and inclusive growth, as skills need to be put into productive use at work.

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  • 13-August-2015

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 34 - What are the advantages today of having an upper secondary qualification?

    In most OECD countries, the large majority of adults had at least an upper secondary qualification in 2013, making the completion of upper secondary education the minimum threshold for successful labour market entry and continued employability or the pursuit of further education.

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  • 13-August-2015

    English

    What are the risks of missing out on upper secondary education? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    In just a couple of decades, upper secondary schooling has been transformed from a vehicle towards upward social mobility into a minimum requirement for life in modern societies.

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  • 11-August-2015

    English

    Non-standard contracts, flexibility and employment adjustment: empirical evidence from Russian establishment data

    This paper examines the use of two forms of non-standard work contracts in Russia with data from an enterprise survey for the years 2009 to 2011. Non-standard work contracts are less costly and more flexible for employers. Internal adjustment in form of wage cuts or unpaid leave is not covered by the Labour Code and earlier practices to impose such measures are less tolerated.

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  • 4-August-2015

    English

    What do youth think? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Interview with Allan Päll - Secretary General of the European Youth Forum

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  • 31-July-2015

    English, PDF, 344kb

    South Africa Policy Brief: Improving the Quality and Relevance of Skills

    South Africa has made impressive progress in improving access to education, but persistent inequities and poor education quality lead to low education outcomes.

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  • 29-July-2015

    English

    Future Shock (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Education occurs in many forms; it’s not the same as schooling.

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