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  • 28-May-2013

    English

    Working with youth: A series of case studies

    How are countries around the world helping youth stay in school, build skills and careers? What are they doing about youth unemployment? These case studies provide a starting point for those looking not only to learn about the problems facing youth today, but how to solve them.

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  • 28-May-2013

    English

    Getting our youth back to work - by Andreas Schleicher, Deputy Director and Special Advisor on Education Policy to the OECD's Secretary-General

    If there’s one lesson we’ve learned over the past few years, it’s that we cannot simply bail ourselves out of a crisis, we cannot solely stimulate ourselves out of a crisis and we cannot just print money our way out of a crisis. But we can become much better in equipping more people with better skills to collaborate, compete and connect in ways that drive our economies forward.

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  • 28-May-2013

    English, PDF, 2,688kb

    Education Indicators in Focus 13 - How difficult is it to move from school to work?

    In some countries, an increasing number of young people are neither in employment, nor in education or training (NEET). A high proportion of NEETs is an indicator of a difficult transition between school and work.

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  • 28-May-2013

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Spotlight - Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives 03: Apprenticeships and Workplace Learning

    How do apprenticeships and other forms of workplace learning help people to make a successful transition from school to work? Global economic competition requires a labour force with a range of mid-level trade, technical and professional skills alongside the high-level skills typically associated with university education.

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  • 21-May-2013

    English

    Investing in Youth: Brazil

    This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth labour market and education system in Brazil. It takes an international comparative perspective, offering policy options to help improve school-to-work transitions. It also provides an opportunity for other countries to learn from the innovative measures that Brazil has taken to strengthen the skills of youth and their employment outcomes.

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  • 15-May-2013

    English

    Russia’s human capital challenge

    To pursue economic growth, Russia must develop its human capital, which requires structural reforms in education, healthcare and pensions. These, in turn, must respond to major trends in service provision, including the increasing role of individual choice, the need to deliver lifelong learning and healthcare, and the risk that Russians will increasingly buy services abroad, rather than work to develop their own national systems.

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  • 14-May-2013

    English

    Video - Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education - Netherlands

    In a drive to raise the quality of classroom teaching and boost student performance, Dutch education authorities are encouraging teachers to learn from each other through a process of peer review.

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  • 14-May-2013

    English

    Video - Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education - Belgium (Flanders)

    Flanders builds a "triangle of quality" based on extensive autonomy for schools, supported by pedagogical advisory services and monitored by government inspectors.

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  • 10-May-2013

    English

    Education for all

    Young people from poorer families are badly underrepresented in higher education. That risks exposing them to a lifetime of reduced earnings and undermines the foundations of wider economic growth. What can be done? Economically disadvantaged students benefit from a mix of grants and loans in third-level education, but they also need better support from the earliest years of their school careers.

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  • 7-May-2013

    English

    The “urban advantage” in education

    Nearly half the world’s population now lives in urban areas. What does that mean for education?

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