By Date


  • 30-March-2018

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Spain

    This report identifies effective strategies to tackle skills imbalances in Spain. It provides an assessment of practices and policies in the following areas: the collection and use of information on skill needs to foster a better alignment between skills acquisition and labour market needs; education and training policies targeting skills development and investment for individuals and employers; activation policies to develop skills through on-the-job learning; and policies facilitating the entry of migrants with skills that are in demand. The assessment is based on country visits, desk research and data analysis conducted by the OECD secretariat.

  • 30-March-2018

    English

    Investing in Youth: Norway

    The present report on Norway is part of the series on "Investing in Youth" which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the areas of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on young people who are not in employment, education or training (the "NEETs").

    Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017).

  • 11-February-2018

    English

    "Youth Circle": Up for the Challenge? Youth and the future of Government

    I must admit, this might be my favourite event of this Summit... but don’t tell anyone! It is indeed a great opportunity to address such a unique and inspiring crowd of young pioneers from a variety of backgrounds.

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  • 1-February-2018

    English

    Education and Skills Newsletter - January 2018

    What's new in education and skills at the OECD?

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  • 1-February-2018

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 58 - How do primary and secondary teachers compare?

    While policy debate is often focused on the whole teaching profession, primary and secondary teachers differ in more ways than one. While all countries require teachers to have at least a bachelor degree to enter the profession in primary or lower secondary education, the structure and content of the programmes vary and are less geared towards practice at secondary than primary level.

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  • 1-February-2018

    English

    Learning for careers: The career pathways movement in the United States (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Learning needs vary as we evolve through life. The early years of education set the stage for children’s well-being, cognitive and social-emotional development; young children starting out in the world require stability, reassurance, and encouragement, and need a warm and caring teacher.

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  • 31-January-2018

    English

    Shaping, not predicting, the future of students (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Footballer Cristiano Ronaldo is reputed to have once said that there’s no point making predictions because nothing is set in stone. It is hard to predict the future, but in education policy at least it is not altogether impossible.

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  • 31-January-2018

    English

    Archived webinar - Academic resilience: What schools and countries do to help disadvantaged students succeed in PISA, with Andreas Schleicher, Director of the OECD Directorate for Education and Skills

    Researchers and policy makers have been focusing on socio-economic disparities in academic achievement since the 1960s. Decades of empirical studies show that socioeconomically disadvantaged students are more likely to: drop out of school, and repeat a grade

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  • 29-January-2018

    English

    Learning for careers: The career pathways movement in the United States (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Digitisation is expected to profoundly change the way we learn and work – at a faster pace than previous major drivers of transformation. Many children entering school today are likely to end up working in jobs that do not yet exist.

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  • 23-January-2018

    English

    Teaching for Global Competence in a Rapidly Changing World

    This new publication sets forward the PISA framework for global competence developed by the OECD, which aligns closely with the definition developed by the Center for Global Education at Asia Society. Based on the Center’s extensive experience supporting educators in integrating global competence into their teaching, the publication also provides practical guidance and examples of how educators can embed global competence into their existing curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

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