OECD Roundtable on Higher Education in Regional and City Development 2012: Universities for skills, entrepreneurship, innovation & growth – Agenda

 

 Wednesday 19 September 2012

OECD Conference Centre CC9

14.00

Registration 

14.30

Welcome & introduction

Andreas SCHLEICHER, Deputy Director and Special Advisor on Education Policy to the Secretary-General, Directorate for Education

 

Higher education driving stronger, fairer and cleaner cities & regions

Reviews of HE in Regional and City Development mobilise HEIs for local socio-economic development. Since 2005, OECD has reviewed over 30 cities and regions in 20+ countries. What are the key lessons? How do the reviews link to other OECD work on skills, entrepreneurship and innovation?

Jaana PUUKKA, OECD/EDU

Comments from:

Rik BLEEKER, Amsterdam Economic Board (NL)
Maciej LITWIN, City of Wroclaw (PL)
Michael PROCTOR, University of Arizona (US)
Holly Mc KIERNAN, Lumina Foundation (US)
Jocelyne GACEL AVILA, University of Guadalajara (MX)
Susan CHRISTOPHERSON, Cornell University (US)
Piyawat BOON-LONG, Knowledge Network Institute of Thailand (THA)
Peter CRETICOS, Institute for Work and the Economy (US

15.30

Chair: Sergio ARZENI, OECD/Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs and Local Development

SKILLS, ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND LOCAL GROWTH

Local skills strategies

What are the key issues that local and regional authorities need to take into consideration when designing a local skills strategy? How can they balance the nurturing and attraction of talent, the integration of disadvantaged groups into the labour force and the up-skilling of those already in employment? What can universities and other HEIs do to support this work?

Jonathan BARR

 

Role of higher education in closing regional skills gaps: Lessons from the OECD reviews of HE in regional and city development

Higher education can play an important role in closing regional skill gaps, but in practice, institutional aspirations and internal reward systems, as well as government policies, conflict with this role.  The session will review the findings from OECD reviews and offer suggestions to overcome barriers to regional engagement.

Aims McGUINNESS, NCHEMS (US)

 

OECD Reviews for Skills for Entrepreneurship
Universities and other HEIs can nurture high growth enterprises, spin-offs and graduate start-ups. What should universities do to increase the number of start-ups, and the survival and growth rates of graduate enterprises? How can the OECD help universities and national/local authorities evaluate and improve policies, strategies, structures and practices in university entrepreneurship?

David HALABISKY, OECD LEED

Comments from:

Massimo GIORDANO, Regional Minister, Piedmont Region (IT)
Aldo BALLERINI, Bio Bio University (CL)
Francesc GRAU, University Rovira i Virgili (ES)
Kirsten PANTON, Microsoft
Raed MU'ALEM, Nazareth Academic Institute (ISR)
Jakob STOLT, Aalborg University (DK)
Abdul Razak DZULKIFLI, Albukhari International University (ML)
Massimo GIORDANO, Regional Minister, Piedmont Region (IT)
Henry ETZKOWITZ, Stanford University (US)
Martin MAHN, Humboldt Innovation (DE)

16.30

BREAK

17.00

Chair: Dominique GUELLEC, OECD/Science, Technology and Industry

FROM GLOBAL TO LOCAL – INNOVATION POLICY MIXES AND SMART SPECIALISATION

Management of research and innovation at institutional and policy levels - Innovation, Higher Education, Research for Development (IHERD)

Management of research and innovation has emerged as a specialised area of management in response to the new policy and funding modalities of research and innovation that have emerged over the last 10 to 20 years. It involves attracting funding, managing funds, liaising with funding bodies, project planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, as well as publications, research dissemination and, in some cases, commercialisation. What are the necessary skills and knowledge requirements on policy and institutional levels for managing research and innovation in the current policy context? What are the implications for developing and emerging countries?

Åsa OLSSON,OECD/STI

 

Innovation policy mixes and implications on HEIs - emerging conclusions from the OECD innovation reviews

The past two decades have seen important shifts in the innovation policy mix in terms of target groups, goals and instruments. Some of these developments – e.g. an increased emphasis on industry-science co-operation and related policy initiatives – had a strong impact on Higher Education institutions. The series of OECD Reviews of Innovation Policy sheds light on related developments in innovation systems across countries of different levels of development.

Gernot HUTSCHENREITER, OECD/STI

 

Smart Specialisation - Policy drive and HEI responses

Higher education institutions can play an important role in the development of Smart Specialisation Strategies. Smart Specialisation has emerged as a new approach to industrial and innovation policy to improve the allocation of public investment in R&D and innovation related investments, including human capital and skills. What can HEIs do to support the policy strategy process? What kind of policy mix is needed to align research, industrial, innovation and educational priorities?

Inmaculada PERIANEZ-FORTE, OECD/STI

Comments:

John HEARN, University of Sydney (AU) and Worldwide Universities Network
Mary WANG, University of Sydney (AU)
Jason LANE, SUNY Albany (US)
Ghita BENKIRANE on behalf of AMAQUEN (Morocco)
Martí PARELLADA, Fundación CYD (Spain)  
John EDWARDS, European Commission
John GODDARD, University of Newcastle upon Tyne (UK)

18.00

END OF DAY 1

19.00

DINNER (self-financed)

Thursday 20 September 2012

OECD Conference Centre CC9

9.30

Chair: Richard YELLAND, OECD/EDU

UNIVERSITIES AND KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Universities and knowledge transfer: Insights from the OECD Regional Innovation Reviews

“Regions rely on universities for knowledge transfer to boost the performance of their regional innovation systems for economic growth. Taking a step back, what are the conditions that determine how much a region can expect from universities in that regard?  And what are the common challenges observed? Research on regional growth and learning points flowing from different OECD territorial reviews will be used to address such questions.”

Karen MAGUIRE, OECD/GOV Regional Development Policy

 

Innovation and knowledge transfer: Mobilising HEIs for business creation and jobs

HEIs’ tech transfer may generate saleable intellectual property and start-ups but rarely enterprises that contribute to local development. What does the experience from the US, Mexico, Spain and Italy teach us?

Susan CHRISTOPHERSON, Cornell University (US)

 

Universities and Triple Helix collaboration

Universities can play a key role in Triple Helix co-operation, if organisational and institutional innovations promote their active involvement.  What can we learn from Sweden and other Nordic countries?

Bjørn T. ASHEIM, CIRCLE (Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy), Lund University (SE)

Comments from:

Robert NACHTMANN, University of Texas, El Paso (US)
Gonzalo RODRIGUEZ-VILLANUEVA, Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora (MEX)
Lidia BORRELL-DAMIAN, European University Association (BEL)
Roy GREEN, University of Technology Sydney (AUS)
Christophe GUY, Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal (CA)
Michel MUDRY, Conference of Directors of French Engineering Schools (FR)
Martina BECHTER, Leuphana University of Luneburg (DE)
Steve CANNON, University of Aberdeen (UK)

10.30

BREAK

11.00

MOBILISING UNIVERSITIES FOR KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Government driving knowledge exchange: Incentives, indicators and evaluation 
Higher Education Funding Council (HEFCE) has a long experience in supporting universities’ industry collaboration and community engagement. Higher Education Innovation Fund HEIF provides incentives for universities to transfer knowledge and improve products, goods and services. What can we learn from the UK experience?

Jenni CHAMBERS, HEFCE (UK)

 

Mobilising university staff in the University Rovira i Virgili – What works in practice?

University Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona has a broad outreach strategy which involves industry engagement, skills development and cultural outreach. How does the university encourage, measure and reward staff involvement in these activities in the Spanish university context? 

Francesc GRAU, University Rovira i Virgili (ES)

 

Mainstreaming university engagement – practical tools to support cultural change

Universities need practical tools to embed public engagement in research and learning, and to move engagement from the periphery to the core of their activities. The EDGE Toolkit, developed by the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement, offers one solution. It enables universities to assess their institutional support for public engagement and helps them to develop an effective public engagement strategy.

Paul MANNERS, University of the West of England (UK)

Comments from:

Baroness Sal BRINTON (UK)
Thandwa MTHEMBU, Central University of Technology (SA)
Leandro TESSLER, UNICAMP (BRA)
Linda ROSENMAN, Victoria University (AUS)

12.00

Wrap up of the Meeting

Comments from:

Mary-Louise KEARNEY, Society for Research into Higher Education (UK)
Michael THOMAS, New England Board of Higher Education (US)
Andy WESTWOOD, GuildHE (UK)

13.00

Meeting closes