Articles


  • 5-July-2016

    English

    Tackling the productivity paradox: The OECD Global Forum on Productivity

    The nexus of slowing productivity growth and rising inequality is capturing the attention of policymakers and researchers. The productivity slowdown, its causes, and the link with inclusiveness will be discussed on 7-8 July in Lisbon at the first Annual Conference of the new Global Forum on Productivity, which was created by the OECD in collaboration with a number of Member and non-Member countries.

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  • 30-May-2016

    English

    The twin challenges of promoting productivity and inclusive growth

    Advanced economies remain in the doldrums. People’s incomes are rising at a very low pace, especially in the lower half of the distribution. Two global trends–the slowdown in productivity and the rise in inequality–reflect the state of policy, and point to the challenges policymakers face to change prospects for their citizens and the global economy.

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  • 24-May-2016

    English

    Can we improve real-time estimates of the output gap for policy purposes?

    The output gap ought to be a key input in short-term policy-making because it provides a summary measure of economic slack, so allowing policy-makers to anticipate inflationary pressures. It can also be used to estimate cyclically-adjusted measures of the fiscal balance, to provide a better assessment of fiscal sustainability.

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  • 8-December-2015

    English

    Are the SDGs a major reboot or a sequel to the MDGs?

    The main reason for putting together the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) was to prevent the Millennium Declaration from falling into oblivion. A declaration issued by a world summit has a shelf-life of about six months. Beyond that period, its life is reduced to a small world, usually the summit’s sponsoring agency.

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Middle-class economics

    In 2014, the US economy added more jobs than in any year since the 1990s. In fact, this longest streak of job growth on record has persisted into 2015. Inflation-adjusted wages are up by 1.4% annually over the last two years, more than twice the pace of the last recovery. But this is still not enough to make up for decades of subpar gains for middle-class families–a challenge shared by many other OECD economies.

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  • 28-April-2015

    English

    What we've learned–and have still to learn–from the financial crisis*

    Financial crises do more than impose huge costs: they have bigger and more insidious effects. We face big challenges in maintaining the supply of global public goods as the world integrates. But these challenges will not be managed successfully if we do not first overcome the legacy of the crisis.

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  • 16-April-2015

    English

    The opportunities and challenges of greener growth: Getting the whole policy package right

    Climate change and, more generally, environmental damage have quantifiable economic and health costs, which weigh on long-term growth and well-being. If left unchecked, climate change is projected to decrease global GDP by 0.7 to 2.5 % by 2060. At the same time, the costs to society of air pollution already appear substantial–equivalent to some 4% of GDP across OECD countries and even higher in some rapidly developing economies.

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  • 13-November-2014

    English

    Europe’s deflation risk

    The OECD does not see deflation taking hold in the euro area, but the risk has risen.

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  • 13-November-2014

    English

    Raising global growth: Why the G20 is “going structural”

    G20 countries are taking action to lift growth in the world economy. Will their commitments be enough?

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  • 13-November-2014

    English

    Why reform is the right option

    “Life is full of alternatives but no choice.” G20 leaders at the summit in Brisbane, Australia, in November should reflect on these words by Australian writer Patrick White, a Nobel Laureate, as they prepare their economic strategies for the years to come.

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