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  • 29-March-2019

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    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Stockholm, on 29 March 2019

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Stockholm, on 29 March 2019, to present the 2019 OECD Economic Survey of Sweden. While in Stockholm, the Secretary-General will hold bilateral meetings with Mr. Stefan Löfven, Prime Minister of Sweden, and several Ministers of his Cabinet.

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  • 29-March-2019

    English

    Launch of the 2019 Economic Survey of Sweden

    Sweden’s economic, environmental, income and gender equality, and well-being achievements are remarkable. Driven by robust consumption, investment and exports, GDP has expanded steadily, at an average rate of close to 3% over the past five years. Unemployment has also declined to 6.3% in 2018 (from 8% in 2013), and the employment rate was close to 80% in 2018.

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  • 29-March-2019

    English

    Launch of the 2019 Economic Survey of Sweden - Press Conference

    Sweden’s economic, environmental, income and gender equality, and well-being achievements are remarkable. GDP has expanded steadily, at an average rate of close to 3% over the past five years. Unemployment has also declined to 6.3% in 2018 (from 8% in 2013), and the employment rate was close to 80% in 2018.

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  • 29-March-2019

    English

    Further reforms in Sweden can drive growth, competitiveness and social cohesion

    The Swedish economy is operating close to full capacity, with robust growth and strong employment, but uncertainties linked to the global economy shroud the outlook. Policy should aim to prolong the expansion and ensure that economic success continues to promote inclusiveness, well-being and social cohesion, according to a new report from the OECD.

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  • 27-March-2019

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Argentina 2019

    Over many decades, Argentina’s economy has been held back by weak policy settings and productivity has stagnated. Recent and additional reforms will help to raise prosperity for all Argentinians in the medium term. Strengthening competition by reducing barriers to market entry and foreign trade has particularly high payoffs. Tariff barriers have prevented a stronger integration into the world economy, which could raise consumer purchasing power, reduce the cost of firms’ inputs and lead companies in shielded sectors to become more productive. Currently, many jobs are trapped in activities with limited potential for productivity and wage growth. As job reallocation can result in temporary income losses, policies should ease the transition by enhancing training and social protection. Social policies are effective in reducing inequalities and poverty continued its declining trend during 2016 and 2017, until a severe economic crisis pushed the economy into a deep recession in 2018. This has shifted the immediate policy focus to restoring confidence and unwinding significant fiscal and external imbalances. Swift and decisive policy responses were necessary and their implementation will lay the grounds for a return of macroeconomic stability and a recovery from the recession, although significant risks remain.SPECIAL FEATURE: FOSTERING INTEGRATION INTO THE WORLD ECONOMY
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  • 27-March-2019

    English

    Further reforms needed for a stronger and more inclusive Argentine economy

    The Argentine economy is expected to begin emerging from its deep recession in 2019, but significant risks remain. Recovery from the crisis will require new efforts to restore confidence, build solid macroeconomic foundations, improve governance, create jobs and ensure that future growth is greener and benefits all Argentinians, according to a new report from the OECD.

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  • 20-March-2019

    English

    OECD Reviews of Pension Systems: Portugal

    This review provides policy recommendations on how to improve the Portuguese pension system, building on the OECD’s best practices in pension design. It details the Portuguese pension system and identifies its strengths and weaknesses based on cross-country comparisons. The Portuguese pension system consists of an old-age safety net, a pay-as-you-go defined benefit scheme and voluntary private savings. The safety net includes an old-age social pension and a complement (the so-called Complemento Solidário para Idosos or CSI), both of which pursue similar objectives but have different eligibility criteria. The defined benefit scheme has two main components: the general social security scheme (regime geral da Segurança Social) and the civil-servant pension scheme (Caixa Geral de Aposentações or CGA). The latter has been closed to new entrants since 2006 with new civil servants contributing to the general scheme. Funded voluntary pensions make up a very small share of total pension entitlements. The OECD Reviews of Pension Systems: Portugal is the fourth in the series, after Ireland (2014), Mexico (2016) and Latvia (2018), with a fifth review on Peru under preparation. 
  • 13-March-2019

    English

    G20 GDP Growth - Fourth quarter of 2018, OECD

    Stable GDP growth in G20 area

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  • 11-March-2019

    English

    Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, March 2019

    CLIs continue to anticipate easing growth momentum in most major economies

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  • 7-March-2019

    English

    Calibrating GDP Fan Charts Using Probit Models with a Comparison to the Approaches of the Bank of England and Riksbank

    Fan charts were pioneered by the Bank of England and Riksbank and provide a visually appealing means to convey the uncertainty surrounding a forecast.

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