By Date


  • 12-October-2014

    English

    G30 International Banking Seminar

    Six years into the crisis and a robust recovery is still distant. The global economy is continuing to expand at a moderate and uneven pace. International trade, global investment and credit are still hesitant. The threat of so-called ‘secular stagnation’ remains high, especially in Europe.

    Related Documents
  • 11-October-2014

    English

    Annual Meetings of the IMF and World Bank - Written Statement to the IMFC

    As a result of continued policy support and favourable financial conditions, global growth is expected to be somewhat more vigorous in the latter part of 2014 and into 2015. Nonetheless, the OECD’s recent Interim Assessment has revised growth projections downwards for most major economies as the recovery is turning out to be weaker than expected.

    Related Documents
  • 10-October-2014

    English

    Contributions to GDP growth: second quarter 2014, Quarterly National Accounts, OECD

    Stockbuilding main driver of OECD GDP growth in the second quarter of 2014

    Related Documents
  • 9-October-2014

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Washington from 9 to 12 October 2014

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, was in Washington from 9 to 12 October 2014 to attend the International Monetary Fund / World Bank Annual meetings, as well as the G20 Finance Ministerial.

    Related Documents
  • 8-October-2014

    English

    Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, October 2014

    Composite leading indicators point to weakening growth in the Euro area and to stable growth in most other major economies

    Related Documents
  • 7-October-2014

    English

    OECD bolsters relationship with Ukraine

    The 34-member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development welcomed a Memorandum of Understanding between the OECD and Ukraine which will help Ukraine’s efforts to tackle corruption, strengthen its tax system and promote competitiveness.

    Related Documents
  • 6-October-2014

    English

    How's Life in Your Region? - Measuring Regional and Local Well-being for Policy Making

    How’s life? The answer can depend on the region in which you live. Many factors that influence people’s well-being are local issues, such as employment, access to health services, pollution and security. Policies that take into account regional differences beyond national averages can therefore have a greater impact on improving well-being for the country as a whole.

    This report presents the OECD analytical framework for measuring well-being at the regional level, as well as internationally comparable indicators on 9 well-being dimensions for 362 regions across 34 OECD countries. It also sets out guidance for all levels of government in using well-being measures to better target policies at the specific needs of different communities. Drawing on a variety of practical experiences from OECD regions and cities, the report discusses methodological and political solutions for selecting regional well-being outcome indicators, monitoring the progress of regional well-being performance over time, and implementing a process of multi-stakeholder engagement to promote social change.

  • 6-October-2014

    English

    14th International Economic Forum on Africa: By Africa, For Africa: Industrialisation and Integration for Inclusive Growth

    This edition of the Forum is called “By Africa, For Africa”. The choice of title underscores the importance of African citizens, African companies and African governments as drivers of the development process. The OECD is here to listen, to engage, and to strengthen this unique partnership with Africa and its institutions.

    Related Documents
  • 2-October-2014

    English

    How Was Life? shows long-term progress in key areas of well-being

    People’s well-being has generally progressed since the early 20th century across a large part of the world, according to new research published by a consortium of economic historians (CLIO-INFRA) and produced in collaboration with the OECD and OECD Development Centre.

    Related Documents
  • 2-October-2014

    English

    How Was Life? - Global Well-being since 1820

    How was life in 1820, and how has it improved since then? What are the long-term trends in global well-being? Views on social progress since the Industrial Revolution are largely based on historical national accounting in the tradition of Kuznets and Maddison. But trends in real GDP per capita may not fully re­flect changes in other dimensions of well-being such as life expectancy, education, personal security or gender inequality. Looking at these indicators usually reveals a more equal world than the picture given by incomes alone, but has this always been the case? The new report How Was Life? aims to fill this gap. It presents the first systematic evidence on long-term trends in global well-being since 1820 for 25 major countries and 8 regions in the world covering more than 80% of the world’s population. It not only shows the data but also discusses the underlying sources and their limitations, pays attention to country averages and inequality, and pinpoints avenues for further research.

    The How Was Life? report is the product of collaboration between the OECD, the OECD Development Centre and the CLIO-INFRA project. It represents the culmination of work by a group of economic historians to systematically chart long-term changes in the dimensions of global well-being and inequality, making use of the most recent research carried out within the discipline. The historical evidence reviewed in the report is organised around 10 different dimensions of well-being that mirror those used by the OECD in its well-being report How’s Life? (www.oecd.org/howslife), and draw on the best sources and expertise currently available for historical perspectives in this field. These dimensions are:per capita GDP, real wages, educational attainment, life expectancy, height, personal security, political institutions, environmental quality, income inequality and gender inequality.

  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 > >>