By Date


  • 8-October-2016

    English

    2016 IMF and World Bank Fall Meetings: Written Statement to IMFC

    The world economy remains in a self-fulfilling low-growth trap. Persistent growth disappointments are weighing on current expectations of future growth and feeding into weak trade, investment, productivity, and wages. Breaking out of this trap is essential if strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth is to be achieved.

  • 7-October-2016

    English

    Global Cyclical and Structural Risks - Remarks at Bretton Woods Committee International Council Meeting

    It is a pleasure to be in Washington to address the Bretton Woods Committee on an issue that concerns us all ─ global cyclical and structural risks. We are approaching a decade since the onset of the crisis and the global economy is still struggling to recover its cruising speed. There are several risks on the OECD’s radar. Let me briefly highlight those that we consider particularly dangerous.

  • 7-October-2016

    English

    October 2016 G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting: Remarks on the global economic outlook

    We remain stuck in the “low-growth” trap that I mentioned in our previous meetings. We are trapped in a vicious circle of weak global demand and adverse supply-side and structural developments – in such areas as investment, trade and productivity – that are undermining the ability of our economies to grow over the long term.

  • 4-October-2016

    English

    Consumer Prices, OECD - Updated: 4 October 2016

    OECD annual inflation edges up to 0.9% in August 2016

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  • 4-October-2016

    English

    MENA countries need structural reforms to spur trade, investment, jobs and trust

    Middle Eastern and North African countries should press ahead with further economic and structural reforms to boost flagging trade and investment, restore public trust and create jobs for the region’s young population, the OECD told ministers from the region today.

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  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Raising well-being in Germany’s ageing society

    Population ageing is setting in earlier in Germany than in most other OECD economies and will be marked.

  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Boosting investment performance in Germany

    Non-residential investment has fallen over the past 20 years as a share of GDP and is now lower than in several other high-income OECD countries.

  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Cardiac arrest or dizzy spell: Why is world trade so weak, what can policy do about it?

    World trade growth was rapid in the two decades prior to the global financial crisis but has halved subsequently.

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  • 28-September-2016

    English

    Product market reforms under the microscope

    Given the secular decline in productivity growth and the persistent weakness of the economic recovery in many advanced economies, increased attention is being paid to the potential role of structural reforms for restoring economic growth.

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  • 28-September-2016

    English

    Making Education Count for Development - Data Collection and Availability in Six PISA for Development Countries

    This report reviews the collection, availability and quality of system-level data and metadata on education from countries participating in the PISA for Development project: Cambodia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Senegal and Zambia. PISA for Development aims to increase low income countries’ use of PISA assessments for monitoring progress towards national goals for improving education and for analysing the factors associated with student learning outcomes, particularly among poor and marginalised populations. The project also helps track progress towards the international education targets defined in the Education 2030 Framework for Action, which the international community adopted in 2015 as the strategy for achieving the Education Sustainable Development Goal (SDG).

    The report suggests technically sound and viable options for improving data quality, completeness and international comparability in the six countries that are reviewed. It also provides insights into overcoming some of the challenges common to countries that participate in PISA for Development and to other middle income and low income countries.

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