By Date


  • 11-December-2014

    English, PDF, 549kb

    Green growth: Environmental policies and productivity can work together

    As environmental pressures continue to rise, governments throughout the OECD area have not been sitting back. If anything, the stringency of their policy measures has been increasing on the whole, not least to combat pollution and climate change. And as the evidence shows, stringent environmental policies can be introduced without hurting overall productivity.

  • 10-December-2014

    English

    Do environmental policies matter for productivity growth?

    Do environmental policies matter for productivity growth? This study presents new evidence on the role of environmental policies – stringency, as well as design and implementation features - for productivity growth.

  • 9-December-2014

    English

    Latin American Economic Outlook 2015 - Education, Skills and Innovation for Development

    The Latin American Economic Outlook is the OECD Development Centre’s annual analysis of economic developments in Latin America. It is produced in partnership with the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) as well as CAF, the development bank of Latin America. Each edition includes a detailed macroeconomic overview as well as analysis of how the global context is shaping economic

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  • 9-December-2014

    English

    The indicators of the economic burdens of environmental policy design – results from the OECD questionnaire

    Environmental policies seek to address market failures related to the protection of the environment. However, they may also increase barriers to entry and distort competition. If stringent environmental policies can be designed in a way that minimises such economic burdens, they can facilitate the achievement of economic and environmental goals and a cleaner growth model.

  • 9-December-2014

    English

    Do environmental policies matter for productivity growth? Insights from new cross-country measures of environmental policies

    Environmental policies address wellbeing and sustainability objectives, affecting firm and household behaviour. A newly developed, cross-country composite proxy of environmental policy stringency (EPS) shows that stringency has been increasing across OECD countries over the past two decades.

  • 9-December-2014

    English

    Empirical evidence on the effects of environmental policy stringency on productivity growth

    This paper investigates the impact of changes in the stringency of environmental policies on productivity growth in OECD countries. Using a new environmental policy stringency (EPS) index, it estimates a reduced-form model of multi-factor productivity growth, where the effect of countries' environmental policies varies with pollution intensity of the industry and technological advancement.

  • 9-December-2014

    English

    Measuring environmental policy stringency in OECD countries - a composite index approach

    Cross-country analysis of the economic effects of environmental policies is limited by the lack of reliable, comparable measures of the stringency of environmental policies. This paper attempts to fill this gap, by constructing new quantitative indexes of environmental policy stringency (EPS).

  • 8-December-2014

    English

    Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, December 2014

    Composite leading indicators point to continued loss of growth momentum in Europe

  • 8-December-2014

    English

    Measuring the Digital Economy - A New Perspective

    The growing role of the digital economy in daily life has heightened demand for new data and measurement tools. Internationally comparable and timely statistics combined with robust cross-country analyses are crucial to strengthen the evidence base for digital economy policy making, particularly in a context of rapid change. This report presents indicators traditionally used to monitor the information society and complements them

  • 3-December-2014

    English

    Trade patterns in the 2060 world economy

    The analysis suggests that over the next 50 years, the geographical centre of trade will continue to shift from OECD to non-OECD regions reflecting faster growth in non-OECD countries.

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