By Date


  • 29-July-2016

    English

    Financial Management of Flood Risk

    Disasters present a broad range of human, social, financial, economic and environmental impacts, with potentially long-lasting, multi-generational effects. The financial management of these impacts is a key challenge for individuals and governments in developed and developing countries. G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors and APEC Finance Ministers have recognised the importance and priority of disaster risk management strategies and, in particular, disaster risk assessment and risk financing. The OECD has supported the development of strategies for the financial management of natural and man-made disaster risks, under the guidance of the OECD High-Level Advisory Board on Financial Management of Large-scale Catastrophes and the OECD Insurance and Private Pensions Committee. This work has included the elaboration of an OECD Recommendation on Good Practices for Mitigating and Financing Catastrophic Risks and a draft Recommendation on Disaster Risk Financing Strategies  The Financial Management of Flood Risk extends this work by applying the lessons from the OECD’s analysis of disaster risk financing practices and the development of its guidance to the specific case of floods.

  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Age, skills and labour market outcomes in Finland

    Macro-simulations benchmarking employment in Finland to the Nordic average show that closing the large gaps in labour participation vis-à-vis the other Nordics across genders and age groups would boost employment significantly.

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Employment and skills in Finland

    Policies to speed up tertiary graduation, improve work incentives and activation of the unemployed and postpone labour market exit are necessary to bring the employment rate closer to the level of other Nordics

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Boosting productivity in Finland

    Reviving productivity requires improving framework conditions further so labour and capital can more easily move to the most dynamic sectors and firms, making the tax system more growth-friendly, and supporting innovation, basic research and young firms’ financing.

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Costa Rica: boosting productivity to sustain income convergence

    Boosting national productivity to sustain the convergence process towards OECD countries living standards will hinge on creating the right conditions for domestic firms to thrive and become more innovative and productive, while maintaining the long-standing commitment to open international markets and investment.

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Making public finances more growth and equity-friendly in the euro area

    To achieve a euro area fiscal stance that fosters the recovery, countries with fiscal space under the Stability and Growth Pact rules should use budgetary support to raise growth, and existing incentives and flexibility should be taken advantage of to pursue reforms of tax and spending policies.

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Priorities for completing the European Union's Single Market

    To support the recovery, structural reforms that yield short-run as well as long-run gains should be prioritised.

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Boosting productivity through greater small business dynamism in Canada

    Small business dynamism is a feature of an SME sector that contributes to overall productivity growth, not an end in itself.

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Forecasting GDP during and after the Great Recession: a contest between small-scale bridge and large-scale dynamic factor models

    This paper compares the short-term forecasting performance of state-of-the-art large-scale dynamic factor models (DFMs) and the small-scale bridge models routinely used at the OECD.

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  • 27-July-2016

    English

    Estimating the distributional impact of the Greek crisis (2009-2014)

    This paper analyses the effects of the Greek crisis on inequality and poverty in 2009-2014 using the micro-simulation model EUROMOD.

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