Germany


  • 12-June-2018

    English

    Economic Survey of Germany 2018

    Germany has been enjoying strong economic performance in recent years, building on strengthened domestic demand, good social outcomes and export performance. Exports have benefited from a large, productive and innovative manufacturing sector which has reinforced its position in sectors of long-standing comparative advantage, notably cars, chemical products and machine tools.

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  • 12-June-2018

    English

    Deeper reforms in Germany will ensure more inclusive and sustainable growth

    The German economy is undergoing a robust expansion, with record-low unemployment and real wage gains underpinning domestic demand while strong exports are driving business investment. The strong fiscal position will offer opportunities for funding structural reforms and public investment to meet future challenges, according to a new report from the OECD.

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  • 12-June-2018

    English

    Launch of the 2018 Economic Survey of Germany

    Germany’s track record is remarkable. Growth has been solid for years, and is set to remain so – we project 2.1 % growth this year and next. As a strong exporter of capital goods, Germany is benefitting from the global recovery of trade and investment. At 3.4% unemployment is at a record low – allowing real wages to grow and sustaining consumption.

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  • 11-June-2018

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Berlin on 11-12 June 2018

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Berlin on 11-12 June 2018 to attend a meeting with Chancellor Merkel and Heads of International Organisations. While in Berlin, the Secretary-General will also present the 2018 OECD Economic Survey of Germany.

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  • 27-April-2018

    English

    Germany: Towards Stronger, Fairer and Greener Growth

    Overall, the German economy is performing very well. Still, many citizens feel they do not sufficiently benefit from Germany’s good economic performance, as evidenced by the outcomes of the recent election. They perceive that their well-being is compromised by technological change, foreign competition and the arrival of migrants. Germany’s new government will have to tackle these issues by making growth not only stronger, but also fairer and greener. This report identifies key policy reforms to help the country achieve this goal, to foster productivity gains, boost public investment and ensuring that everybody can benefit from Germany’s strong economy and that no one is left behind. The German government needs the right labour, education and tax policies to foster access to quality jobs for everyone, including women, youth, the elderly and immigrants, while meeting the country’s climate objectives. The OECD is proud of its long-standing policy dialogue with Germany and looks forward to supporting the new government. Together, let us design, promote and implement better policies for better lives in Germany and worldwide.
  • 30-November-2017

    English

    G20 Global Forum on Steel Excess Capacity Ministerial Meeting

    The global economy is now growing at its fastest pace since 2010, with the upturn becoming increasingly synchronised across countries.

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  • 13-April-2017

    English

    Towards a Better Globalisation - How Germany Can Respond to the Crisis

    People in many countries, especially advanced countries, are expressing growing discontent about globalisation. They feel that its benefits have accrued mostly to a small and already well-off segment of the population. In addition, many citizens are dissatisfied with the way economic integration has been advanced. They complain about too little transparency and too many conflicts of interests between policy makers and firms. Several of the negative effects feeding the discontent have more to do with technological change than with globalisation per se, but the two are closely intertwined. Moreover, the policies put in place to alleviate negative impacts of economic openness on some groups, industries and regions have not always worked as intended, and global rule-making has not kept up with reality. Given its many benefits, reversing economic integration is not a solution. Rather, we need to find ways to make it work for all. This report sets out what needs to be done to advance a fairer and more inclusive globalisation – at the global level, at the European level and within Germany.
  • 11-April-2017

    English, PDF, 2,843kb

    Towards a Better Globalisation: How Germany can respond to the critics

    Citizens in many countries are expressing dissatisfaction with how they believe trade, technology and immigration are affecting their daily lives. While much of this discontent can be traced back to the global economic crisis, its root causes are more complex. What can be done at the Global, European and German level?

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  • 17-March-2017

    English, PDF, 104kb

    Going for Growth 2017 - Germany

    This country note from Going for Growth 2017 for Germany identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

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  • 20-February-2017

    English

    Dare to Share: Germany's Experience Promoting Equal Partnership in Families

    This review introduces the background to and issues at stake in promoting equal partnerships in families in Germany.  It encourages German policy makers to build on the important reforms since the mid-2000s to enable both fathers and mothers to have careers and children, and urges families to 'dare to share'. To those ends it places Germany’s experience in an international comparison, and draws from the experience in, for example, France and the Nordic countries which have longstanding policies to support work-life balance and strengthen gender equality. The review starts with an overview chapter also explaining why and how equal sharing pays for families, children, the economy and society as a whole. The book presents current outcomes, policy trends, as well as detailed analysis of the drivers of paid and unpaid work and how more equal partnerships in families may help sustain fertility rates.  The book examines policies to promote partnership, looking both at persistent shortcomings and progress achieved through reform since the mid-2000s. The book includes a set of policy recommendations designed to enable parents to share work and family responsibilities more equally.
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