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Colombia


  • 24-October-2019

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Colombia 2019

    Colombia has made good economic and social progress over the last two decades. Macroeconomic policies are solid and have sustained growth and smooth adjustments to shocks over the years. Maintaining and strengthening the policy framework is key to sustainable macroeconomic policies and setting the basis for higher productivity and inclusiveness. Putting Colombia on a path to stronger and more inclusive growth, and reducing dependence on natural resources, requires boosting productivity by adopting structural reforms in competition, regulations, trade policy, infrastructure, innovation, and skills. Reducing informality and boosting job-quality would extend the benefits of growth to all Colombians, underpinning economic and political support for reform. SPECIAL FEATURES: BOOSTING EXPORTS AND INTEGRATION INTO THE WORLD ECONOMY; FOSTERING HIGH-QUALITY JOBS FOR ALL
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  • 12-February-2019

    English

    Production Transformation Policy Review of Colombia - Unleashing Productivity

    Colombia, the fourth largest economy in Latin America, is back on track after decades of conflict. The country is looking to open up opportunities by addressing structural challenges, further benefiting from trade and investment, and increasing productivity. Colombia's march towards prosperity requires transforming the economy through a renewed policy approach that prioritises an expanded knowledge base, unlocks regional potential and fast tracks digital technologies. The success will depend on Colombia’s capacity to leverage its long-standing planning capacity and its ability to bring together all the relevant stakeholders.The Production Transformation Policy Review (PTPR) of Colombia provides a novel and timely assessment of the country's industrialisation strategies. It relies on international peer learning and domestic consensus building, and benefited from knowledge sharing through the OECD Initiative for Policy Dialogue on Global Value Chains, Production Transformation and Development.
  • 23-February-2018

    English

    Public spending in education and student’s performance in Colombia

    This paper investigates if higher public spending in education and better teacher qualifications are related to student’s performance, using data from Saber 11, a national standardized test conducted by Instituto Colombiano para la Evaluación de la Educación.

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  • 26-October-2017

    English

    Reducing inequality to raise incomes and expand well-being for all Colombians

    The peace agreement will boost economic growth, but to share it fairly Colombia must also achieve better educational outcomes and bring more people into the more productive formal economy.

  • 18-October-2017

    English

    Reigniting growth through productivity-enhancing reforms in Colombia

    Over the past decade, sound macroeconomic policies and an improved business environment have helped generate relatively strong GDP growth.

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  • 18-October-2017

    English

    Towards more inclusive growth in Colombia

    Growth has become more inclusive in recent years in Colombia. Strong growth and targeted social policies have reduced absolute poverty.

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  • 25-May-2017

    English

    Colombia: Raise productivity and make growth more inclusive

    The Colombian economy has been more resilient than other Latin American countries to the recent fall in commodities prices, and remains among the strongest in the region.

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  • 25-May-2017

    English

    Economic Survey of Colombia 2017

    Since 2000, the quality of life of Colombians has improved markedly. Macroeconomic and social policies have sustained strong GDP growth and reduced poverty.

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  • 25-May-2017

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Colombia 2017

    Growth in Colombia has been among the strongest in the region, reflecting the flexible exchange rate and inflation targeting monetary policy, and fiscal rules. The strong growth and welfare programmes to the most vulnerable groups have substantially reduced poverty. Lower taxes and fees on wages have brought more people to better quality formal jobs, thereby raising both productivity and inclusiveness. Productivity and job opportunities have also been enhanced by recent reforms facilitating the opening of business, obtaining construction permits, registering property and paying taxes. However, productivity growth is still low and the gap between rich and poor among the highest in Latin America. Informality and gender gaps remain high, and social mobility low. Years of armed conflict, stringent local regulations and distortions in the tax system have created disparities in productivity and access to basic services across regions. Further simplifying procedures for company registration and the affiliation of workers to social security, improving labour market programmes, expanding early childhood education, and raising education quality would boost inclusion, social mobility and living standards. Greater and more affordable child, elderly and disability care would open the job market to more women. Raising productivity will be fundamental to continued increases in living standards for all Colombians.

    SPECIAL FEATURES: PRODUCTIVITY; INCLUSIVE GROWTH

  • 25-May-2017

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Colombia 2017

    Growth in Colombia has been among the strongest in the region, reflecting the flexible exchange rate and inflation targeting monetary policy, and fiscal rules. The strong growth and welfare programmes to the most vulnerable groups have substantially reduced poverty. Lower taxes and fees on wages have brought more people to better quality formal jobs, thereby raising both productivity and inclusiveness. Productivity and job opportunities have also been enhanced by recent reforms facilitating the opening of business, obtaining construction permits, registering property and paying taxes. However, productivity growth is still low and the gap between rich and poor among the highest in Latin America. Informality and gender gaps remain high, and social mobility low. Years of armed conflict, stringent local regulations and distortions in the tax system have created disparities in productivity and access to basic services across regions. Further simplifying procedures for company registration and the affiliation of workers to social security, improving labour market programmes, expanding early childhood education, and raising education quality would boost inclusion, social mobility and living standards. Greater and more affordable child, elderly and disability care would open the job market to more women. Raising productivity will be fundamental to continued increases in living standards for all Colombians.SPECIAL FEATURES: PRODUCTIVITY; INCLUSIVE GROWTH
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