Labour markets, human capital and inequality

Focus

  • Enhancing Economic Flexibility: What Is in It for Workers?

    Reforms that boost growth by enhancing economic flexibility often meet strong opposition related to concerns that they may imply adverse consequences for categories of workers. This study investigates how making product or labour market regulation more flexible changes workers’ risks of moving out of employment and jobless people’s chances of becoming employed.

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  • Blog Post: What do pro-competitive policies IMPLY for workers?

    Reforms that make economies more competitive have become a polarising subject. On one side, they are well established as a core staple of reform programmes: they are known to boost growth. On the opposite side, they often come up as lightning rods for criticism, as some perceive that such reforms make life more difficult for workers. And some people may lose from such reforms.

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  • Costa Rica: boosting productivity to sustain income convergence

    Boosting national productivity to sustain the convergence process towards OECD countries living standards will hinge on creating the right conditions for domestic firms to thrive and become more innovative and productive, while maintaining the long-standing commitment to open international markets and investment.

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Enhancing Economic Flexibility: What Is in It for Workers?

Reforms that boost growth by enhancing economic flexibility often meet strong opposition related to concerns that they may imply adverse consequences for categories of workers. This study investigates how making product or labour market regulation more flexible changes workers’ risks of moving out of employment and jobless people’s chances of becoming employed.

 

BlogPost: What do pro-competitive policies IMPLY for workers?

Less income inequality and more growth - Are they compatible?

Can both less income inequality and more growth be achieved? A recent OECD study sheds new light on the link between policies that boost growth and the distribution of income. It suggests that there are win-win policy options: raising human capital is key, various labour market reforms can help and taxation can be made more equitable and growth friendly. But there are also reforms that lead to a trade-off between growth and equity.