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Mexico


  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Mexico 2017

    Skills are central to Mexico’s future prosperity and the well-being of its people. Improving opportunities for all Mexicans to develop high quality and relevant skills and supporting employers to improve their human resources management can help Mexico to raise productivity levels and, by extension, the incentives for employers to hire individuals in the formal sector. Fostering better and more equitable skills outcomes, especially for women and youth, will also provide the foundation for building a healthier, more equitable, and more cohesive society.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Mexico sets out eight skills challenges for Mexico. These challenges were identified through two interactive workshops with stakeholders, bilateral meetings, internal discussions with experts at the OECD, and analysis of documents and data produced by the OECD and other organisations. The first six challenges refer to specific outcomes across the three pillars of developing, activating and using skills. The next two challenges refer to the 'enabling' conditions that strengthen the overall skills system. Success in tackling these skills challenges will boost performance across the whole skills system.
  • 27-September-2017

    English

    Financial inclusion and women entrepreneurship: evidence from Mexico

    Financial inclusion and women entrepreneurship concern policymakers because of their impact on job creation, economic growth and women empowerment.

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  • 21-April-2017

    English

    Doing well by doing good: The role of Mexico's firms in achieving sustainable and inclusive growth

    The private sector can be a strategic partner in the pursuit of sustainable and inclusive growth, with the ability to have a profound impact, particularly in areas such as climate change, inclusiveness, equality and good governance.

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  • 17-March-2017

    English, PDF, 99kb

    Going for Growth 2017 - Mexico

    This country note from Going for Growth 2017 for Mexico identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

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  • 7-March-2017

    English

    Boosting productivity in Mexico through integration into Global Value Chains

    Mexico’s structural reforms are already boosting productivity, but more can be done.

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  • 17-January-2017

    English

    Mexico’s reforms are paying off, but there is much left to do

    The government has rolled out major structural reforms since 2012 aimed at improving growth, well-being and income distribution. The initial wave of reforms, kicked-off by the multi-partisan political commitments in the Pacto por México, led to notable progress across a range of areas and put Mexico at the forefront of reformers among OECD countries.

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  • 10-January-2017

    English

    Economic Survey of Mexico 2017

    Ambitious structural reforms and sound macroeconomic policies have ensured the resilience of the highly-open Mexican economy in the face of challenging global conditions.

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  • 26-June-2015

    English

    Global dialogue on the future of productivity: Towards an OECD productivity network

    Luis Videgaray, Mexico’s Minister of Finance and Angel Gurría, OECD Secretary-General will co-host this event in Mexico City on 6-7 July 2015, with a welcoming by the President of Mexico. Participants will share their views on the key factors that will influence future productivity growth and the creation of an OECD Productivity Network.

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  • 8-April-2015

    English

    Sharing the fruits of growth with all Mexicans

    The government has introduced major structural reforms to fight poverty, improve the quality of education, create more jobs in the formal sector and move towards a universal social security system. This is a substantial accomplishment. However, Mexico needs to build a more inclusive state.

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  • 8-April-2015

    English

    What makes Mexicans happy?

    As in other countries, in Mexico income, education, health, job status and other individual characteristics are significantly associated with life satisfaction. These findings suggest that the higher average level of life satisfaction in Mexico is probably related to unobserved country characteristics.

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