Reports


  • 15-November-2017

    English

    Addressing Forced Displacement through Development Planning and Co-operation - Guidance for Donor Policy Makers and Practitioners

    Despite the increasingly protracted nature of situations of forced displacement, development policy makers and practitioners have tended to overlook the longevity of displacement. Forced displacement has long been viewed primarily as an emergency humanitarian issue by providers of development co-operation and the focus of the international community has predominantly been on addressing the immediate protection and short-term humanitarian needs of forcibly displaced persons. However, with increasing levels of new and protracted displacement, and key commitments such as the 2030 Agenda, donors are looking at the role of development actors and financing in supporting sustainable and comprehensive solutions to forced displacement.  This Guidance, therefore, provides a clear and practical introduction to the challenges faced in working in situations of forced displacement, and provides guidance to donor staff seeking to mainstream responses to forced displacement into development planning and co-operation. While recognising that donor policies and responses are constantly evolving, this guidance proposes that donors responding to these situations prioritise three broad areas of work, where they can best contribute to existing capacities at the national, regional and global levels. It also identifies twelve actions, grouped under four key principles, outlining what donors can do to reinforce the capacities of key actors to respond to refugees and Internally Displaced Persons at the national, regional and global levels, and to advance comprehensive solutions.

  • 6-November-2017

    English

    Evaluating multilateral effectiveness - work of the DAC Evaluation Network

    Overview of the DAC Evaluation Network's current work on multilateral effectiveness, including development effectiveness reviews and UNEG-DAC peer reviews of evaluation systems.

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  • 6-November-2017

    English

    Social Protection System Review of Cambodia

    In 2017, the Royal Government of Cambodia published a new Social Protection Policy Framework (SPPF), providing an ambitious vision for a social protection system in which a comprehensive set of policies and institutions operate in sync with each other to sustainably reduce poverty and vulnerability.The Social Protection System Review of Cambodia prompts and answers a series of questions that are crucial for the implementation ofthe framework : How will emerging trends affect the needs for social protection, now and into the future? To what extent are Cambodia’s social protection instruments able – or likely – to address current and future livelihood challenges? How does fiscal policy affect social protection objectives?
     
    This review provides a contribution to the ongoing policy dialogue on social protection, sustainable growth and poverty reduction. It includes four chapters. Chapter 1 is a forward-looking assessment of Cambodia’s social protection needs. Chapter 2 maps the social protection sector and examines its adequacy. An investigation of the distributive impact of social protection and tax policy is undertaken in Chapter 3. The last chapter concludes with recommendations for policy strategies that could support the establishment of an inclusive social protection system in Cambodia, as envisaged by the SPPF.
  • 23-October-2017

    French, PDF, 3,257kb

    Youth Well-being Policy Review of Togo

    This report provides an exhaustive overview of the situation of young people in terms of social inclusion and well-being. Based on the results of the analysis, concrete policy recommendations are proposed in order to maximize government action in favor of youth.

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  • 19-October-2017

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Luxembourg 2017

    This review assesses the performance of Luxembourg, including looking at its efforts towards climate finance, the impact of its concentration on the quality of its portfolio and its vision for partnerships.
  • 17-October-2017

    English

    Development Co-operation Report 2017 - Data for Development

    The 2017 volume of the  Development Co-operation Report focuses on Data for Development. 'Big Data' and 'the Internet of Things' are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way that economies and societies are functioning across the planet. The Sustainable Development Goals along with the data revolution are opportunities that should not be missed: more and better data can help boost inclusive growth, fight inequalities and combat climate change. These data are also essential to measure and monitor progress against the Sustainable Development Goals.The value of data in enabling development is uncontested. Yet, there continue to be worrying gaps in basic data about people and the planet and weak capacity in developing countries to produce the data that policy makers need to deliver reforms and policies that achieve real, visible and long-lasting development results. At the same time, investing in building statistical capacity – which represented about 0.30% of ODA in 2015 – is not a priority for most providers of development assistance.There is a need for stronger political leadership, greater investment and more collective action to bridge the data divide for development. With the unfolding data revolution, developing countries and donors have a unique chance to act now to boost data production and use for the benefit of citizens. This report sets out priority actions and good practices that will help policy makers and providers of development assistance to bridge the global data divide, notably by strengthening statistical systems in developing countries to produce better data for better policies and better lives.
  • 17-October-2017

    English

    Evidence-based Policy Making for Youth Well-being - A Toolkit

    With 1.2 billion people, today’s youth population aged 15-24 represents the largest cohort ever to enter the transition to adulthood. Close to 90% of these young people live in developing countries, and the numbers will practically double in the least developed countries. These young people are the world’s next generation and a unique asset. If properly nurtured, they can act as engines for economic and social progress. Hence, the political will has grown among many national governments to develop comprehensive policy frameworks that better respond to young peoples’ needs and aspirations through national youth policies.
     
    This toolkit provides analytical tools and policy guidance, based on rigorous empirical evidence and international good practices, to countries that are developing, implementing or updating their youth policies. The toolkit includes step-by-step modules to carry out a youth well-being diagnosis and includes practical examples of common youth policies and programmes in the areas of employment, education and skills, health and civic participation.
     
  • 12-October-2017

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Africa 2017

    The publication Revenue Statistics in Africa is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and the OECD Development Centre, the African Union Commission (AUC) and the African Tax Administration Forum (ATAF) with funding by the European Union. It compiles comparable tax revenue and non-tax revenue statistics for 16 countries in Africa: Cabo Verde, Cameroon,  the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, Morocco, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Togo, Tunisia and Uganda. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to African countries enables comparisons of tax-to-GDP ratios and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among African economies and with OECD, Latin American, Caribbean and Asian economies.
  • 11-October-2017

    English

    Multi-Dimensional Review of Panama - Volume 1: Initial Assessment

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, Panama has exhibited remarkable economic growth and has reduced the gap in terms of income per capita with high-income countries. Social progress has also been achieved, mainly through the reduction of poverty and advances in some well-being dimensions. However, challenges remain with regard to overcoming the so-called middle-income trap and consolidating the middle-class. This first volume of the Multi-dimensional Country Review of Panama identifies the main barriers to further inclusive development. It highlights that promoting equitable, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and improving the well-being of all citizens should be at the core of Panama’s development strategies.
  • 7-October-2017

    English

    Women's Economic Empowerment in Selected MENA Countries - The Impact of Legal Frameworks in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia

    This report examines how current legal provisions in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia are impacting women’s ability to fully participate in economic life, both as employees and entrepreneurs. It is based on a comparative analysis of the various rights set out in constitutions, personal status laws, labour laws, in addition to tax and business laws. The report recognises the considerable progress made – in particular in the aftermath of the 2011 uprisings – following the adoption of constitutional and institutional reforms to strengthen women’s status.Yet ensuring sufficient opportunities for women remains a challenge in the six countries. The report suggests that this may be due to different factors such as: the existence of certain laws that are gender discriminatory, contradictions between various legal frameworks, lack of enforcement mechanisms, and barriers for women in accessing justice.  Through targeted policies, countries can tackle these challenges, and help unleash women’s potential to boost growth, competitiveness and inclusive social development.
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