Reports


  • 8-November-2011

    English, , 1,093kb

    Findings from the Gender Equality Module of the 2011 Paris Declaration Monitoring Survey

    Twenty-four of the developing countries that undertook the 2011 Paris Declaration Monitoring Survey chose to also pilot the survey’s gender equality module. Read the full report here.

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  • 31-October-2011

    English

    Strengthening Accountability in Aid for Trade

    At a time when aid budgets are under pressure and scrutiny, there is a need to improve accountability. This is especially true in the case of aid for trade, which has become an increasingly important priority in development co-operation.   Strengthening Accountability in Aid for Trade looks at what the trade and development community needs to know about aid-for-trade results, what past evaluations of programmes and projects reveal about trade outcomes and impacts, and how the trade and development community could improve the performance of aid for trade interventions.
  • 26-October-2011

    English

  • 24-October-2011

    English, , 753kb

    Evaluation Insights #2: Assessing the impacts of budget support

    Evaluation Insights are informal working papers issued by the Network on Development Evaluation of the OECD DAC. This note synthesizes main findings on the contribution of budget support to development results, from three pilot evaluations in Mali, Tunisia and Zambia.

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  • 18-October-2011

    English, , 753kb

    Evaluation Insights #2: Assessing the impacts of budget support

    This note provides an overview of the main findings and conclusions from three recent joint evaluations in Mali, Tunisia and Zambia, testing a jointly developed methodology for evaluating budget support.

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  • 29-September-2011

    English

    Better Policies for Development - Recommendations for Policy Coherence

    This report examines the ways in which wider policies can be use to support our common development objectives. It focuses on areas requiring collective action by the entire international community, and complements the OECD’s continuing work on aid effectiveness and monitoring aid flows.

    It starts from two premises. First, policies ranging from trade and investment to tax and fiscal transparency, corporate governance, climate change, resource security and social policy have a profound impact on the prospects for achieving sustainable development. Second, whilst these require action by national governments and regional organisations in both developed and developing countries, in today’s interconnected world they also require collective action by the entire international community.

    The report covers 18 development policy topics divided into four broad categories: sustainable economic growth, economic governance, the environment and natural resource security, and society. Together these reflect the OECD’s mission to promote better policies for better lives.

  • 28-September-2011

    English

    Netherlands - DAC Peer Review of Development Co-operation

    The Netherlands is one of only five DAC members to have achieved the United Nations (UN) target of allocating 0.7% of its national income as official development assistance (ODA). Since 1975 it has surpassed this target every year.

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  • 26-September-2011

    English

  • 20-September-2011

    English

    2011 Survey on Monitoring the Paris Declaration

    When developed and developing countries committed themselves to the 2005 Paris Declaration principles for achieving more effective aid, they agreed not only to a set of principles, but also to meeting a set of measurable targets by 2010.

  • 16-September-2011

    English

    Investing in Security - A Global Assessment of Armed Violence Reduction Initiatives

    Conservative estimates indicate that at least 740 000 men, women, youth and children die each year as a result of armed violence, most of them in low- and medium-income settings. The majority of these deaths occur in situations other than war, though armed conflicts continue to generate a high incidence of casualties.   Approaches to preventing and reducing these deaths and related suffering are becoming increasingly important on the international agenda. In spite of the global preoccupation with the costs and consequences of armed violence, comparatively little evidence exists about how to stem its risks and effects. Virtually no information is available on Armed Violence Reduction and Prevention interventions, much less their effectiveness.

    This publication aims to fill this gap. It seeks to generate more understanding of what works and what does not, to stimulate further evaluation and to contribute to more effective and efficient policies and programmes.

    A large-scale mapping of Armed Violence Reduction and Prevention activities around the world form the basis of analysis, focusing primarily on programming trends in six countries – Brazil, Burundi, Colombia, Liberia, South Africa and Timor-Leste. These countries represent the very different programming contexts – from high rates of urban criminal violence to protracted post-conflict insecurity – in which development practitioners are currently engaged.

    While offering new data and analysis, this assessment builds directly on the 2009 publication Armed Violence Reduction: Enabling Development.

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