Reports


  • 26-September-2016

    English

    Innovation, Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability in Turkey

    Productivity growth in the Turkish agricultural sector is supported today by better technologies, crop varieties and animal breeds. Yet improvements have slowed since the late 2000s, and the productivity gap between agriculture and the rest of the economy remains large. To overcome these challenges, Turkey will need to reduce the substantial technological and human resource disparities between small-holder and commercial segments in agriculture, and ensure more equal regional development. Considerable structural adjustment is also required, both within agriculture and in the overall economy, supported by broad policy actions in the areas of labour, education, social security systems, and land reform. Important efforts have been made to boost national innovation systems, but there remains considerable catch up in terms of the quality and impact of R&D.

     

  • 20-September-2016

    English

    Extended Producer Responsibility - Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management

    This report updates the 2001 Guidance Manual for Governments on Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR), which provided a broad overview of the key issues, general considerations, and the potential benefits and costs associated with producer responsibility for managing the waste generated by their products put on the market. Since then, EPR policies to help improve recycling and reduce landfilling have been widely adopted in most OECD countries; product coverage has been expanded in key sectors such as packaging, electronics, batteries and vehicles; and EPR schemes are spreading in emerging economies in Asia, Africa and South America, making it relevant to address the differing policy contexts in developing countries.
     
    In light of all of the changes in the broader global context, this updated review of the guidelines looks at some of the new design and implementation challenges and opportunities of EPR policies, takes into account recent efforts undertaken by governments to better assess the cost and environmental effectiveness of EPR and its overall impact on the market, and addresses some of the specific issues in emerging market economies.

  • 7-September-2016

    English

    SMEs in Libya's Reconstruction - Preparing for a Post-Conflict Economy

    The report is intended to contribute to the implementation of policies in a post-conflict Libya to promote private sector development. The report analyses the structural economic and framework conditions prevalent in Libya, highlights potential drivers of development and considers the role of SMEs and entrepreneurship promotion in driving post-conflict recovery. Based on international experience and practices, and considering the context of the country, the report identifies the necessary legal frameworks, institutions and policies for the promotion of SME and entrepreneurship. The document is part of a wider MENA Transition Fund project to support the design and implementation of SME policies in Libya.

  • 18-August-2016

    English

    Corruption in the Extractive Value Chain - Typology of Risks, Mitigation Measures and Incentives

    One case of transnational corruption out of five occurs in the extractive sector according to the 2014 OECD Foreign Bribery Report. In this area, corruption has become increasingly complex and sophisticated affecting each stage of the extractive value chain with potential huge revenue losses for the public coffers. This report is intended to help policy makers, law enforcement officials and stakeholders strengthen prevention efforts at both the public and private levels, through improved understanding and enhanced awareness of corruption risk and mechanisms. It will help better tailoring responses to evolving corruption patterns and effectively countering adaptive strategies. The report also offers options to put a cost on corruption to make it less attractive at both the public and private levels.

  • 12-August-2016

    English

    Collaborative Strategies for In-Country Shared Value Creation - Framework for Extractive Projects

    The Framework is an operational tool offering guidance on actionable steps for harnessing non-renewable natural resources to build competitive, diversifi ed, and sustainable economies in a scalable manner. It presents a practical guide on how host governments, extractives industries and civil society can work together in a structured and systematic way to enable in-country shared value creation and advance the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Framework transcends sectoral boundaries and focuses on strategies to foster coherence, sequencing, and effective co-ordination for integrated policymaking, and suggests monitoring and evaluation mechanisms to assess progress and impact over time.
    The actionable steps are addressed to governments, industry, and civil society clearly articulating their respective roles for improved collaboration, mutual respect and accountability.

  • 4-August-2016

    English

    Reforming Economic Instruments for Water Resources Management in Kyrgyzstan

    This report presents recommendations on the reform of economic instruments for water resources management in Kyrgyzstan, specifically on tariffs for urban water supply and sanitation (WSS) and irrigation water, pollution charges, surface water abstraction charges for enterprises (consumptive and non-consumptive uses), specific land tax rates for the Issyk-Kul biosphere reserve, as well as taxes and customs duty on products contributing to water pollution. For each instrument, alternative reform options are identified and assessed, and preferred options put forward, with an action plan.

  • 22-July-2016

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Denmark 2016

    The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts periodic reviews of the individual development co-operation efforts of DAC members. The policies and programmes of each member are critically examined approximately once every five years. DAC peer reviews assess the performance of a given member, not just that of its development co-operation agency, and examine both policy and implementation. They take an integrated, system-wide perspective on the development co-operation and humanitarian assistance activities of the member under review.

  • 21-July-2016

    English

    Peer Reviews of DAC Members

    Peer Reviews of DAC members

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  • 21-July-2016

    English

    Measuring Distance to the SDGs Targets: a pilot assessment of where OECD countries stand

    The Study, piloted on selected OECD countries, leverages on the OECD work on well-being and the wealth of its data, and is a first attempt at estimating the distance that OECD countries have to travel to achieve the target levels set for 2030.

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  • 18-July-2016

    English

    Development Co-operation Report 2016 - The Sustainable Development Goals as Business Opportunities

    The face of development has changed, with diverse stakeholders involved – and implicated – in what are more and more seen as global and interlinked concerns. At the same time, there is an urgent need to mobilise unprecedented resources to achieve the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The private sector can be a powerful promotor of sustainable development. Companies provide jobs, infrastructure, innovation and social services, among others. Increasingly, investments in developing countries – even in the least developed countries – are seen as business opportunities, despite the risks involved. The public sector can leverage the private sector contribution, helping to manage risk and providing insights into effective policy and practice. Yet in order to set the right incentives, a better understanding is needed of the enabling factors, as well as the constraints, for businesses and investors interested in addressing sustainable development challenges.
    The Development Co-operation Report 2016 explores the potential and challenges of investing in developing countries, in particular through social impact investment, blended finance and foreign direct investment. The report provides guidance on responsible business conduct and outlines the challenges in mobilising and measuring private finance to achieve the SDGs.  Throughout the report, practical examples illustrate how business is already promoting sustainable development and inclusive growth in developing countries. Part II of the report showcases the profiles and performance of development co-operation providers, and presents DAC statistics on official and private resource flows.  
     

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