Reports


  • 19-May-2014

    English, PDF, 908kb

    ERG 23-24 Jan 2014: Summary

    Summary record of the 23-24 Jan 2014 meeting of the expert reference group on external financing for development.

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  • 7-May-2014

    English, Excel, 1,265kb

    Looking ahead to Global Development Beyond 2015: Lessons Learnt from the Initial Implementation Phase of the OECD Strategy on Development

    This note looks at: (i) lessons learnt from the initial period of implementation; (ii) major trends, emerging challenges and global agendas that will guide follow up work of the Strategy on Development; and (iii) recommendations for Members’ consideration aimed at securing effective implementation going forward.

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  • 6-May-2014

    English, PDF, 1,194kb

    Bringing the International Tax Rules into the 21st Century: Update on Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS), Exchange of Information, and the Tax and Development Programme

    As requested in the Declaration on BEPS adopted at the 2013 Ministerial Council Meeting , this note reports on progress made on the Comprehensive Action Plan (CAP) to address BEPS. It also provides an update on the key work streams of the OECD tax agenda of particular relevance to the 2014 Ministerial Council Meeting.

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  • 29-April-2014

    English

    Innovation and Modernising the Rural Economy

    This publication is a result of the discussions from the OECD 8th Rural Development Policy Conference: "Innovation and modernising the rural economy" which took place in Krasnoyarsk, Russia on 3-5 October 2012. It provides an overview of the two themes of modernisation and innovation, focusing on identifying the attributes of the modern rural economy and showing how it differs from the traditional rural economy and from metropolitan economies. It also shows how rural innovation is a key driver of rural economic growth using patents as a measure.

    The second part of the book consists of four chapters that offer evidence of rural regions’ potential to contribute to national economic growth. In addition, each provides useful context for Part I by outlining four different perspectives on the process of modernisation and innovation, and specifically, how they can take place in the rural territories of OECD countries. In each paper, the authors explore the opportunities and impediments to these twin processes and how government policy can help or hinder them.

  • 28-April-2014

    English

    Better Policies for Development 2014 - Policy Coherence and Illicit Financial Flows

    This edition of Better Policies for Development focuses on illicit financial flows and their detrimental effects on development and growth. Every year, huge sums of money are transferred out of developing countries illegally. The numbers are disputed, but illicit financial flows are often cited as outstripping official development aid and inward investment. These flows strip resources from developing countries that could be used to finance much-needed public services, such as health care and education.

    This report defines policy coherence for development as a global tool for creating enabling environments for development in a post-2015 context. It shows that coherent policies in OECD countries in areas such as tax evasion, anti-bribery and money laundering can contribute to reducing illicit financial flows from developing countries. It also provides an update on OECD efforts to develop a monitoring matrix for policy coherence for development, based upon existing OECD indicators of ‘policy effort’. The report also includes contributions from member states. Most illustrate national processes to deal with policy coherence for development beyond 2015.

  • 24-April-2014

    English, PDF, 3,965kb

    Better Policies for Development 2014

    Every year, huge sums of money are transferred out of developing countries illegally. This report shows that coherent policies in OECD countries in areas such as tax evasion, anti-bribery and money laundering can contribute to reducing illicit financial flows from developing countries.

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  • 23-April-2014

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows from Developing Countries - Measuring OECD Responses

    This publication identifies the main areas of weakness and potential areas for action to combat money-laundering, tax evasion, foreign bribery, and to identify, freeze and return stolen assets. It also looks at the role of development agencies and finds that the potential returns to developing countries from using ODA on issues like combating tax evasion or asset recovery are significant.  Finally, it identifies some opportunities for a scaled-up role for development agencies.

  • 22-April-2014

    English

    Climate Resilience in Development Planning - Experiences in Colombia and Ethiopia

    Climate-related disasters have inflicted increasingly high losses on developing countries, and with climate change, these losses are likely to worsen. Improving country resilience against climate risks is therefore vital for achieving poverty reduction and economic development goals.

    This report discusses the current state of knowledge on how to build climate resilience in developing countries. It argues that climate-resilient development requires moving beyond the climate-proofing of existing development pathways, to consider economic development objectives and resilience priorities in parallel. Achieving this will require political vision and a clear understanding of the relation between climate and development, as well as an adapted institutional set-up, financing arrangements, and progress monitoring and evaluation. The report also discusses two priorities for climate-resilient development: disaster risk management and the involvement of the private sector.

    The report builds on a growing volume of country experiences on building climate resilience into national development planning. Two country case studies, Ethiopia and Colombia, are discussed in detail.

  • 15-April-2014

    English, PDF, 1,995kb

    Responsible Business Conduct: From good intentions to sustainable development

    The private sector creates jobs, provides goods and services, generates income and profits, and contributes to public revenues. Companies have the ability to profoundly impact poverty reduction and sustainable development in countries in which they operate, including in areas such as energy and climate, water, agriculture and food production, gender equality and financial integrity.

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  • 4-April-2014

    English

    Geographical Distribution of Financial Flows to Developing Countries - 2014 Edition

    This publication provides comprehensive data on the volume, origin and types of aid and other resource flows to around 150 developing countries.

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