Publications & Documents


  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Senegal African Economic Outlook 2017

    The economy grew by an estimated 6.7% in 2016, with 6.8% expansion predicted for 2017 and 7% in 2018. The Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG) ranked Senegal 10th out of 54 countries in 2016 and one of the three that improved their position in the four categories of the index.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Sao Tome and Principe African Economic Outlook 2017

    Sao Tome and Principe’s economy was estimated to have grown by 5% in 2016, led by agricultural investment and tourism, and growth is set to continue in 2017 and 2018 by 5.5% on average. The country has improved on the Mo-Ibrahim Index of African Governance moving to 11th place in 2016 from 13th in 2015 reflecting efforts to improve good governance.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Protecting human rights and the spirit of justice

    We live in an era of fear and division. Across the world, toxic “us versus them” narratives are being used to cast collective blame for social and economic grievances onto whole groups of people, demonising them and justifying discrimination or repressive measures against them.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Rwanda African Economic Outlook 2017

    GDP growth slowed to 6.0% in 2016 and headline inflation rose sharply to 7.2%, the highest level since 2012. Rwanda remains peaceful and stable and preparation for the August 2017 presidential elections have commenced, with the constitution amended to address presidential term limits.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Nigeria African Economic Outlook 2017

    In 2016, Nigeria’s economy slipped into recession for the first time in more than two decades reflecting adverse economic shocks, inconsistent economic policies, and deepening security problems in the north east and Delta regions. The outlook for 2017 is for a moderate economic recovery with real GDP projected to grow at 2.2% spurred by increased infrastructure spending and restoration of oil production to previous levels.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Niger African Economic Outlook 2017

    Economic growth rebounded to 5.2% in 2016 from 3.5% in 2015, thanks mainly to agricultural production and growth is projected to remain strong at 5.6% in 2017. Terrorism and security threats from neighbouring countries (Mali, Libya and Nigeria), falling world oil and uranium prices, and slower growth in the Nigerian economy continue to have an impact on Niger’s economic situation.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Namibia African Economic Outlook 2017

    Growth sharply moderated to 1.3% in 2016 but should rebound in 2017 as the agriculture sector recovers and production from new mines accelerates. On-going fiscal consolidation policy measures to reduce public debt and help address the current account imbalance will need to protect growth-promoting public investments.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Mozambique African Economic Outlook 2017

    GDP growth declined to 4.3% in 2016 due to fiscal tightening, slowdown in foreign direct investment and the “hidden” debt crisis; it is expected to pick up to 5.5%, driven by exports from the extractives sector. Though the incidence of poverty has declined, the number of poor people remains almost the same, amidst growing inequalities.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Morocco African Economic Outlook 2017

    Morocco’s economy grew by an estimated 1.5% in 2016 due to the adverse impact of poor rainfall but the economy is projected to grow by 3.7% in 2017. Parliamentary elections in October 2016 were won by the right-wing Islamist Justice and Development Party.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Mauritius African Economic Outlook 2017

    The pace of economic growth was moderate in 2016, with the economy growing by 3.6% compared with 3.4% in 2015 reflecting a slight increase in domestic investment that was offset by weak external demand. Political stability and sound macroeconomic management continue to promote investor confidence.

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