Publications & Documents


  • 12-November-2014

    English, PDF, 564kb

    SAEO 2015 Press release - Myanmar

    Emerging Asia to see healthy medium-term growth but institutional reforms will be critical for future, says the OECD Development Centre in the latest Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India 2015.

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  • 12-November-2014

    English, PDF, 173kb

    SAEO 2015 Press Release - Japanese

    Emerging Asia to see healthy medium-term growth but institutional reforms will be critical for future, says the OECD Development Centre in the latest Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India 2015.

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  • 12-November-2014

    English

    Emerging Asia to see healthy medium-term growth but institutional reforms will be critical for future, says the OECD Development Centre

    While the outlook for many OECD countries remains subdued, Emerging Asia is set for healthy growth over the medium term. Annual GDP growth for the ASEAN -10, China and India is forecast to average 6.5% over 2015-19. Growth momentum remains robust in the 10 ASEAN countries, with economic growth averaging 5.6% over 2015-19.

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  • 12-November-2014

    English

    Developing countries and BEPS

    Engagement of developing countries in the international tax agenda, including on BEPS, is imperative, in particular to ensure they receive appropriate support to address the specific implementation challenges they face. The input received from developing countries has been fed directly into the development of the BEPS Action Plan.

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  • 12-November-2014

    English

    Developing countries to play greater role in OECD/G20 efforts to curb corporate tax avoidance

    The OECD released today its new Strategy for Deepening Developing Country Engagement in the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) Project, which will strengthen their involvement in the decision-making processes and bring them to the heart of the technical work.

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  • 11-November-2014

    English

    Southeast Asia should switch to a greener growth model, OECD says

    Southeast Asia’s over-reliance on natural resources like oil, gas, minerals and wood for economic growth is unsustainable over the long term and is causing environmental damage that will hurt future prosperity if left unchecked, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 11-November-2014

    English

    Towards Green Growth in Southeast Asia

    Southeast Asia’s booming economy offers tremendous growth potential, but also large and interlinked economic, social and environmental challenges. The region’s current growth model is based in large part on natural resource exploitation, exacerbating these challenges. This report provides evidence that, with the right policies and institutions, Southeast Asia can pursue green growth and thus sustain the natural capital and environmental services, including a stable climate, on which prosperity depends.

    Carried out in consultation with officials and researchers from across the region, Towards Green Growth in Southeast Asia provides a framework for regional leaders to design their own solutions to move their countries towards green growth. While recognising the pressures that Southeast Asian economies face to increase growth, fight poverty and enhance well-being, the report acknowledges the links between all these dimensions and underscores the window of opportunity that the region has now to sustain its wealth of natural resources, lock-in resource-efficient and resilient infrastructure, attract investment, and create employment in the increasingly dynamic and competitive sectors of green technology and renewable energy.

    Some key policy recommendations are that these challenges can be met by scaling up existing attempts to strengthen governance and reform countries’ economic structure; mainstreaming green growth into national development plans and government processes; accounting for the essential ecosystem services provided by natural capital, ending open-access natural resource exploitation; and guiding the sustainable growth of cities to ensure well-being and prosperity.

  • 3-November-2014

    English

    Media Advisory - Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India 2015

    The latest Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India, jointly prepared by OECD Development Centre and the ASEAN Secretariat, to be published on Thursday 13 November 2014, assesses Asia’s regional economic growth, development and regional integration process. The Outlook discusses the medium-term economic outlook and identifies structural reforms that can strengthen institutional capacity.

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  • 3-November-2014

    English

    Regional Perspectives on Aid for Trade

    Deepening economic integration via regional co-operation has emerged as a key priority in the reform strategies of most developing economies over the past decade. This is evidenced by the explosive growth in bilateral and regional trading agreements in which they now participate. Regional aid for trade can help developing countries spur regional economic integration, enhance competitiveness, and plug into regional production networks.

    Based on a rich set of experiences regarding regional aid for trade projects and programmes, the study finds that regional aid for trade offers great potential as a catalyst for growth, development and poverty reduction. The study recommends greater emphasis on regional aid for trade as a means of improving regional economic integration and development prospects. While regional aid for trade faces many practical implementation challenges, experience has shown that associated problems are not insurmountable but do require thorough planning, careful project formulation, and prioritization on the part of policy makers.

  • 28-October-2014

    English

    Social Cohesion Policy Review of Viet Nam

    This report examines the effects of recent economic growth in Viet Nam on social cohesion. It finds that recent rapid economic growth in Viet Nam has not resulted in an increase in overall inequality, but the level of inequality was already high.

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