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  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Latin American Economic Outlook 2018 - Rethinking Institutions for Development

    The Latin American Economic Outlook 2018: Rethinking Institutions for Development focuses on how institutions can underpin the foundations of a long period of sustained and inclusive growth and increased well-being. The report begins with an overview of the main macroeconomic challenges, analysing the complex macroeconomic context in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region, and exploring policy options to boost potential growth, with a particular focus on trade. It then analyses the link between low trust and society’s disconnection and dissatisfaction  with institutions and a number of long-standing, structural features of the region as well as more recent, contextual dynamics that are shaping LAC’s economy, society and politics . In this respect, the report examines how the social contract can be strengthened in LAC, mainly through a state that delivers and responds to citizens’ changing demands, as well as through policies and institutions which provide good and equal socio-economic opportunities in a rapidly changing global context.
  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Development aid stable in 2017 with more sent to poorest countries

    Foreign aid from official donors totalled USD 146.6 billion in 2017, a small decrease of 0.6% from 2016 in real terms as less money was spent on refugees inside donor countries but with more funds flowing to countries most in need of aid, according to preliminary official data collected by the OECD.

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  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Launch of ODA Figures 2017

    I am delighted to be with you today to present our analysis of global aid trends in 2017. Official development assistance – or ODA – is, and will remain, a crucial pillar of development finance.

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  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Regaining citizens’ trust in public institutions is key to resuming inclusive growth and well-being in Latin America and the Caribbean

    After five years of economic slowdown and a two-year recession in 2015-2016, LAC is on the path of a frail economic recovery. According to estimates in the Outlook, the region’s gross domestic product (GDP) is projected to increase again between 2 and 2.5% in 2018, after reaching 1.3% growth on average in 2017.

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  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Multi-Dimensional Review of Thailand (Volume 1) - Initial Assessment

    Thailand has made impressive progress over the past several decades, both in economic and social terms. Sustained strong growth and a rapidly modernising economy have turned Thailand into an upper middle-income country with a strong urban centre. Economic success has brought impressive social advancement. Poverty has plummeted, while education and health services have considerably expanded and improved. These achievements have brought Thailand to a new stage and a new set of challenges.Rising prosperity has not been shared equally across the country and economic transformation needs a boost. The share of those in precarious employment still exceeds half of the working population. The creation of new activities replacing low-productivity ones has slowed while rural migrants and urban poor lack the skills required for modern urban jobs. While Bangkok’s success as a metropolis has been key to Thailand’s transformation, thriving secondary cities are needed that can develop new sources of growth.Experience shows that development is not about getting everything right, but about getting right what matters most. The Initial Assessment of this Multi-Dimensional Review endeavors to identify the challenges and key constraints that must be overcome for Thailand to succeed. It offers recommendations related to informality, productivity and the management of natural resources, particularly water. The next volumes will provide further suggestions for action to address these challenges.
  • 5-April-2018

    English

    OECD Global Forum on Development 2018

    It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the OECD for the 2018 Global Forum on Development. My particular thanks to Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary of Denmark for opening the Forum with me this morning.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda's Economy

    Immigrants' contribution to Rwanda's economy is relatively small, but growing. Unlike in many other developing countries, immigrants in Rwanda are on average better educated and work in more productive sectors than the native-born population. Although immigration is associated with a small reduction in the employment rate of the native-born population, immigrants' contribution to the Rwandan gross domestic product is higher than their share in employment. In addition, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they receive in government benefits, leading to a positive effect on the fiscal balance. A mix of migration policies, aimed at meeting labour market needs and fostering immigrants’ integration, and non-migration policies, intending to leverage the impact of immigration on the economy, would help enhance the contribution of immigrants to Rwanda’s economy.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 27-March-2018

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018 compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for 25 Latin American and Caribbean economies, the majority of which are not OECD member countries. The publication is based on the OECD Revenue Statistics database, which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean enables comparison of tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among the economies of the region and with OECD member countries. This publication is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, the OECD Development Centre, the Inter-American Center of Tax Administrations (CIAT), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).
  • 26-March-2018

    English

    Australia needs to shore up development aid to match its reinforced engagement

    Australia’s active global engagement on development and its focus on fragile small island states and disaster risk reduction are commendable. However successive cuts to the country’s aid budget since 2013 are impairing its efforts, according to the latest DAC Peer Review of Australia.

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  • 26-March-2018

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Australia 2018

    Australia has a strong voice on the global stage. It actively and consistently advocates for the interests of small island developing states and the Pacific region and on issues such as disaster risk reduction and gender equality. In line with this focus, the government has introduced a clear overarching policy vision and associated strategies and guidance for development co-operation. A robust performance framework reflects Australia’s strategic orientations, with value for money at the forefront. Among other issues, this review also looks at how the Australian government has managed the integration of aid within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the resulting opportunities and challenges.
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