By Date


  • 20-January-2016

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Kazakhstan - Volume 1. Initial Assessment

    Kazakhstan’s economy and society have undergone deep transformations since the country declared independence in 1991. Kazakhstan’s growth performance since 2000 has been impressive, averaging almost 8% per annum in real terms and leading to job creation and progress in the well-being of its citizens. Extractive industries play an important role in the dynamism of the economy, but sources of growth beyond natural resource sectors remain underexploited. In the social arena, dimensions of well-being beyond incomes and jobs have not kept pace with economic growth.
    Kazakhstan has set itself the goal of becoming one of the 30 most developed countries in the world by 2050. To sustain rapid, inclusive and sustainable growth and social progress, Kazakhstan will need to overcome a number of significant challenges. Natural-resource dependency, the concentration of economic clout and a fragile and underdeveloped financial sector limit diversification and economic dynamism. Widespread corruption still affects multiple state functions, undermines the business environment, meritocracy and entrepreneurial spirit. More generally, the state has limited capacity to fulfil some of its functions, which affects the delivery of public services like health and education, as well as the protection of the environment and the generation of skills.

  • 18-January-2016

    English, PDF, 2,386kb

    Promoting Productivity for Inclusive Growth in Latin America

    After a period of relatively robust growth that has allowed tens of millions of poorer households to join the global middle class, growth in Latin America has slowed recently. To close the still large gaps in living standards in relation to advanced economies, the region needs to significantly raise productivity growth while making sure that everybody has the opportunity to benefit.

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  • 15-January-2016

    English

    Aid to Health

    The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) collects aid flows at activity level based on a standard methodology and agreed definitions. Aid to Health is covered by two main sectors; 1.Aid to Health - General and Basic Health, and, 2. Population Policies/Programmes and Reproductive Health - includes HIV/AIDS.

  • 8-January-2016

    English

    OECD converts complete 2013 and final 2014 Creditor Reporting System (CRS) data into XML format, by donor and by recipient

    The OECD is now making its Creditor Reporting System (CRS) data on DAC members available in XML format. CRS data on development finance can now be downloaded in four different formats and cater to different audiences.

  • 8-January-2016

    English

    Multilateral aid

    More than 200 multilateral agencies - such as the United Nations, the World Bank and the global funds - receive or serve as a channel for about one third of total ODA. Our work on multilateral aid provides a clearer picture of the multilateral system.

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  • 8-January-2016

    English

    Aid fragmentation and aid orphans

    The pattern of how aid is delivered and received is splintered across too many donors, each with their own processes and priorities, working in often overlapping relationships with each other. We help donors and recipients understand where fragmentation occurs and invest where aid is most needed.

  • 8-January-2016

    English

    Country programmable aid (CPA)

    Built on an earlier concept of “core” aid, we have developed the concept of country programmable aid (CPA). CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country.

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  • 17-December-2015

    English

    Transparency

    Transparency has been pushed to the top of the global agenda. The DAC's mandate to further the understanding of development finance, strengthen aid delivery, improve development policy and build partnerships for development is both complimentary to and a crucial part of the success of the global transparency agenda.

  • 16-December-2015

    English

    Gender discrimination in social institutions and long-term growth

    Women’s economic empowerment remains a critical challenge around the globe. Only half of working-age women are in the labour force, earning on average 24% less than men and are less likely to receive a pension (UN Women, 2015). Women are also disproportionately concentrated in informal and precarious employment, and they spend nearly two and a half more times than men in unpaid care and domestic work (OECD 2014).

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  • 15-December-2015

    English

    How middle class are middle-income households in Latin America?

    One of the most important achievements of the recent period of economic expansion in Latin America has been the substantial reduction of poverty and the surge of an emerging middle class. According to World Bank estimates, in 2009 the Latin American population with a daily income of between 4 and 50 dollars a day represents 68% in the region today.

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