By Date


  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Ethiopia African Economic Outlook 2017

    Real GDP growth slowed to 8.0% in 2015/161 from 10.4% last year and is projected to remain stable at 8.1% in 2016/17 and 2017/18. Public protests disrupted the nation in 2016 in the Oromia and Amhara regions, with the protestors citing concerns about political and economic marginalisation. The authorities declared a six-month state of emergency in October 2016, enacting a variety of measures to restore peace.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Eritrea African Economic Outlook 2017

    Real GDP growth slowed down to 3.8% in 2016 from 4.8% in 2015, reflecting challenges in the business and investment environment and capacity gaps in government institutions. The government’s decision to access supplemental-support resources from the AfDB’s Transition Support Facility to scale up investments in agriculture should strengthen resilience and improve livelihoods for the majority of the rural population.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Equatorial Guinea African Economic Outlook 2017

    Real GDP contracted by 8.2% in 2016 and is expected to shrink further by 5.9% in 2017. This recession is related to lower production in the oil and gas sectors. • Large hydrocarbon revenues made it possible in 2016 to continue major structural changes underway for over 20 years, both in infrastructure and human development.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Egypt African Economic Outlook 2017

    The economic outlook for 2017 remains cautiously optimistic largely based on the government’s ability to maintain the policy and structural reform agenda as well as successfully implement the sustainable development strategy.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Djibouti African Economic Outlook 2017

    Driven by large investment projects, growth remained buoyant at 6.3% in 2016 and is projected to rise to 6.7% in 2017 and 6.8% in 2018. After widening for two consecutive years, the budget deficit improved in 2016, but debt remained critical, with an economy focused on services, transport in particular.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Côte d’Ivoire African Economic Outlook 2017

    Economic growth remains strong but still relies on exporting raw materials, especially crops, which are subject to variations in global prices and climate risks. Significant progress has been made in access to health care, education and social protection, but the past five years’ growth does not cover the strong social demand.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Democratic Republic of the Congo African Economic Outlook 2017

    The growth rate of the Congolese economy fell from 6.9% in 2015 to 2.5% in 2016, but could rebound to 4.0% in 2017 and 5.2% in 2018, given the expected rise in prices of the country’s raw materials. The DRC made some progress in terms of human development in 2016, but that progress remains fragile.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Congo African Economic Outlook 2017

    The economy shrank by 2.4% in 2016 (after expanding by 2.6% the previous year), amid difficult conditions worldwide, in particular a sharp drop in oil prices, and is expected to grow by 0.5% in 2017. The proportion of the population living in poverty fell from 50.2% to 37% between 2005 and 2011, but social indicators remain mixed, and some are incompatible with Congo’s status as a middle-income country (MIC).

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Comoros African Economic Outlook 2017

    Economic growth was 2.1% in 2016 due to the ongoing electricity crisis, but thanks to the new government’s efforts to resolve and clean up public finances, growth is projected to reach 3.4% in 2017 and 4.1% in 2018. The 2016 elections led to political change: the new President of the Union and the three island governors were all elected from the opposition.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Chad African Economic Outlook 2017

    The costs involved in combatting jihadi movements and the continuing low world price of oil mean that economic growth, which was already negative in 2016, will again be so in 2017. The economic, financial and security environments are particularly difficult, and the extension of structural reforms seems essential if macroeconomic stability is to be maintained in 2017.

    Related Documents
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 > >>