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  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Using aid for structural change in fragile states could help curb rising instability

    The world has grown more violent over the last decade, interrupting a long-term trend of increasing peace and disproportionately impacting civilians. This is despite rising financial flows to the most vulnerable places, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Moving forward: How effective development can deliver the 2030 Agenda - remarks at Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation 2nd high-level meeting

    As I mentioned at the opening of our conference, we need to go from billions to trillions when it comes to development finance. The Global Partnership provides a strong platform for bringing together the wide range of actors to make that happen.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    States of Fragility 2016 - Understanding Violence

    The world is getting more violent, and violence is occurring in surprising places. Over the past 15 years, 3.34 billion people, or almost half of the world’s population, have been affected by violence. The number of violent conflicts is decreasing, but conflicts are killing more people: conflict-related deaths have tripled since 2003. Violent extremism and terrorism are also on the rise. The economic cost of violence is rising too: the global economic impact of violence is a staggering USD 13.6 trillion, equivalent to 13.3% of Global GDP. And civilians, especially children and women, are most at risk.

    States of Fragility 2016: Understanding Violence takes a long hard look at violence in the world – and what we should do about it. The report showcases emerging thinking about violence, presents a new risk-based approach to monitoring various dimensions of fragility, and looks at financial flows in support of fragile contexts. Understanding Violence finds that development, peace and security efforts in the developing world have not kept pace with the new reality of violence. We need to dedicate more resources and attention to violence. And to be effective, we need to put people – especially youth – at the centre of our efforts.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Second High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation - opening remarks

    The urgency of sustainable development is evident in all countries. Shifts in wealth, power and growth challenge traditional development models. At the same time, we see new players, new ideas and new sources of finance. Developing countries are increasingly using taxes and remittances to finance their own development. In Africa alone in absolute numbers, tax revenues dwarf official development assistance by more than ten times.

  • 29-November-2016

    English

    Tax revenues continue to rise, but scope remains for increased tax mobilisation in emerging Southeast Asian economies

    In 2014, the tax-to-GDP ratios of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore were below 17% of GDP compared to Japan and Korea, which both recorded tax-to-GDP ratios above 24%,according to new data released in the third edition of the OECD’s annual publication Revenue Statistics in Asian Countries.

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  • 29-November-2016

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Asian Countries 2016 - Trends in Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore

    This publication compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database – a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to Asian countries enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among Asian economies and between OECD and Asian economies. This work has been is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and the OECD Development Centre.

  • 25-November-2016

    English

    DACnews: Keep abreast of the latest in development co-operation

    DACnews brings you the latest news, statistics and best practice recommendations from the OECD DAC plus guest speakers and comment from leaders in development.

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  • 23-November-2016

    English

    Hungary - the Development Assistance Committee’s 30th Member

    At its meeting on 6 December 2016, the DAC invited Hungary to join the committee. Hungary accepted this invitation and, in a letter addressed to the OECD Secretary General, pledged to fulfil obligations of DAC membership

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  • 17-November-2016

    English

    Donor support to southern women’s rights organisations: OECD findings

    The case for investing in women’s rights organisations is firmly established. This report seeks to shed light on how this can best be done. It reviews how DAC donors are partnering with southern women’s rights organisations and identifies promising approaches, models and mechanisms.

  • 15-November-2016

    English

    Improving Economic Instruments for Water Resources Management in the Republic of Buryatia (Lake Baikal Basin)

    A major challenge facing the Republic of Buryatia, subject of the Russian Federation, is how to balance the task of protecting Lake Baikal – a unique water object and ecological system included in the UNESCO list of World Natural Heritage Areas – with the need for dynamic and sustainable socio-economic development of the republic.  This requires streamlining and improving water policy jointly with economic, administrative, information and other policy instruments. The recommendations in this report aim to help achieve this objective. They include the introduction of abstraction charges for irrigation water as a  natural resource; enhancement of state support to the water sector; and improvement of economic instruments for managing risks of water-related hazards (such as compulsory insurance and differentiated land tax rates in flood prone areas). A few innovative instruments are also recommended for pilot testing such as establishing limits for discharges of certain hazardous substances in a pilot area (e.g. Selenga river basin) and progressive development of market for tradable quotas for discharges of the “capped” pollutants; and introducing a charge (tax) on toxic agricultural chemicals (pesticides, herbicides, etc.) and synthetic detergents so that to create incentives for the reduction of diffuse water pollution.

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