Thailand


  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Multi-Dimensional Review of Thailand (Volume 1) - Initial Assessment

    Thailand has made impressive progress over the past several decades, both in economic and social terms. Sustained strong growth and a rapidly modernising economy have turned Thailand into an upper middle-income country with a strong urban centre. Economic success has brought impressive social advancement. Poverty has plummeted, while education and health services have considerably expanded and improved. These achievements have brought Thailand to a new stage and a new set of challenges.Rising prosperity has not been shared equally across the country and economic transformation needs a boost. The share of those in precarious employment still exceeds half of the working population. The creation of new activities replacing low-productivity ones has slowed while rural migrants and urban poor lack the skills required for modern urban jobs. While Bangkok’s success as a metropolis has been key to Thailand’s transformation, thriving secondary cities are needed that can develop new sources of growth.Experience shows that development is not about getting everything right, but about getting right what matters most. The Initial Assessment of this Multi-Dimensional Review endeavors to identify the challenges and key constraints that must be overcome for Thailand to succeed. It offers recommendations related to informality, productivity and the management of natural resources, particularly water. The next volumes will provide further suggestions for action to address these challenges.
  • 20-December-2017

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Thailand's Economy

    The effects of immigration on the Thai economy are considerable, as the number of immigrants has increased rapidly since the turn of the century. Immigrant workers now contribute to all economic sectors, and are important for the workforce in industrial sectors such as construction and manufacturing and in some service sectors including private household services. Immigration is associated with an improvement of labour market outcomes of the native-born population, and in particular appears to increase paid employment opportunities. Immigration is also likely to raise income per capita in Thailand, due to the relatively high share of the immigrant population which is employed and therefore contributes to economic output. Policies aiming to further diversify employment opportunities for immigrant workers could also be beneficial for the economic contribution of immigration.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Thailand’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary and in some cases primary data sources.
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 12-November-2014

    English

    Emerging Asia to see healthy medium-term growth but institutional reforms will be critical for future, says the OECD Development Centre

    While the outlook for many OECD countries remains subdued, Emerging Asia is set for healthy growth over the medium term. Annual GDP growth for the ASEAN -10, China and India is forecast to average 6.5% over 2015-19. Growth momentum remains robust in the 10 ASEAN countries, with economic growth averaging 5.6% over 2015-19.

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  • 28-June-2011

    English

    Social cohesion in Southeast Asia: Experts’ meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, 21 July 2011

    Social cohesion is the topic of the upcoming edition of the Perspectives on Global Development report which every year, identifies analyses and provides workable policy solutions for a pressing global development challenge.

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  • 3-November-2010

    English

    Medium-term Projection Framework for Growth and Development in Southeast Asia

    The results of medium-term projections in the Southeast Asian Economic Outlook are produced based on the OECD Development Centre Medium-term Projection Framework of the SAEO 2010 (MPF: SAEO 2010).

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  • 6-July-2009

    English

    Aid for Trade at a Glance 2009 - Thailand

    The Aid for Trade at a Glance 2009: Maintaining Momentum report presents the results of the second monitoring exercise of the Aid for Trade Initiative and documents its success so far.

  • 25-May-2009

    English, , 218kb

    2nd OECD-Southeast Asia Regional Forum: Enhancing Competitiveness through Regional Integration

    Government officials from ASEAN countries and investment experts gathered to discuss on various efforts to create a more attractive investment climate in Southeast Asia at the Forum. OECD’s investment instruments and peer review methods were presented and well received by participants as they can help advance their own agenda of investment policy reforms. The Forum took place in Bangkok, Thailand on 27-28 April 2009.

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  • 3-January-2008

    English

    Aid for Trade: Donor & Partner Country Profiles

    Aid for Trade at a Glance 2007: The OECD Creditor Reporting System (CRS) database is used to track ODA flows from Development Assistance Committee (DAC) member countries.

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  • 24-November-2006

    English

    Meeting the Challenge of Private Sector Development: Evidence from the Mekong Sub-region

    This book analyses how local firms can get involved in global value chains, access distant and profitable markets and upgrade their capabilities. Based on case studies, the book reviews experiences of governments and enterprises in the Mekong sub-region.

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