Rwanda


  • 26-July-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to South Africa's Economy

    Immigrants contribute considerably to South Africa’s economy. In contrast to popular perception, immigration is not associated with a reduction of the employment rate of the native-born population in South Africa, and some groups of immigrants are likely to increase employment opportunities for the native-born. In part due to the high employment rate of the immigrant population itself, immigrants also raise the income per capita in South Africa. In addition, immigrants have a positive impact on the government’s fiscal balance, mostly because they tend to pay more in taxes. Policies focused on immigrant integration and fighting discrimination would further enhance the economic contribution of immigrants in South Africa.How Immigrants Contribute to South Africa’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 2-May-2018

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda's Economy

    Immigrants' contribution to Rwanda's economy is relatively small, but growing. Unlike in many other developing countries, immigrants in Rwanda are on average better educated and work in more productive sectors than the native-born population. Although immigration is associated with a small reduction in the employment rate of the native-born population, immigrants' contribution to the Rwandan gross domestic product is higher than their share in employment. In addition, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they receive in government benefits, leading to a positive effect on the fiscal balance. A mix of migration policies, aimed at meeting labour market needs and fostering immigrants’ integration, and non-migration policies, intending to leverage the impact of immigration on the economy, would help enhance the contribution of immigrants to Rwanda’s economy.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Rwanda African Economic Outlook 2017

    GDP growth slowed to 6.0% in 2016 and headline inflation rose sharply to 7.2%, the highest level since 2012. Rwanda remains peaceful and stable and preparation for the August 2017 presidential elections have commenced, with the constitution amended to address presidential term limits.

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  • 1-April-2016

    English

    Rising tax revenues are key to economic development in African countries

    Tax revenues in African countries are rising as a proportion of national incomes, according to the inaugural edition of Revenue Statistics in Africa. In 2014, the eight countries covered by the report - Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Mauritius, Morocco, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa and Tunisia - reported tax revenues as a percentage of GDP ranging from 16.1% to 31.3%.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Rwanda African Economic Outlook 2015

    Real GDP grew by 7.0% in 2014, higher than the initially projected 6.0% and the 4.7% recorded in 2013. Growth in industry slowed as a result of a downturn in mining, manufacturing and construction.

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  • 19-May-2014

    English

    African countries need to tap global markets more effectively to strengthen their economies, says new African Economic Outlook

    By participating more effectively in the global production of goods and services, Africa can transform its economy and achieve a development breakthrough, according to the latest African Economic Outlook, released at the African Development Bank Group’s Annual Meetings.

  • 16-January-2012

    English

    Promoting responsibly sourced minerals: What can donors do?

    About the work of the DAC International Network on Conflict and Fragility (INCAF) to support implementation of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas.

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  • 6-June-2011

    English

    African Economic Outlook 2011

    The 2011 African Economic Outlook was launched at the African Development Bank’s Annual Meetings in Lisbon, Portugal on 6 June, 2011.

  • 2-July-2010

    English, , 276kb

    Do No Harm: Case Study Rwanda

    One of six case studies linked to the publication Do No Harm: International Support for Statebuilding, this report provides practical guidance to avoid risks of undermining statebuilding.

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