El Salvador


  • 4-August-2017

    Spanish

    Proyecto Inclusión Juvenil - El Salvador

    Tras el fin de la guerra civil en 1992, El Salvador ha sufrido importantes cambios económicos, políticos y sociales. Los jóvenes de 15 a 24 años, que representan el 20,8% de la población total en 2014, y desempeñan un papel importante en el proceso de desarrollo de un país caracterizado por uno de los índices criminales más altos del mundo.

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  • 4-August-2017

    Spanish

    El Salvador: Taller nacional, 31 de enero - 2 de febrero de 2017

    La OCDE organizó con el Instituto Nacional de Juventud de El Salvador un taller del 31 de enero al 2 de febrero de 2017.

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  • 6-July-2017

    English

    El Salvador: Mid-term review workshop, 31 January – 2 February 2017

    The OECD organized together with the Instituto Nacional de Juventud of El Salvador a workshop in San Salvador, El Salvador from 31 January to 2 February 2017.

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  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 30-March-2016

    English

    Key Issues affecting Youth in El Salvador

    The article contains general information on youth-related issues in El Salvador.

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  • 30-March-2016

    English

    Youth Inclusion project - El Salvador

    Following the end of the civil war in 1992, El Salvador has undergone substantial economic, political, and social change. Young people aged 15-24, accounting for 20.8% of the total population[1] in 2014, play a significant role in the development process of a country that is characterized by one of the highest criminal rates in the world.

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  • 20-January-2014

    English

    Latin America: Tax revenues continue to rise, but are low and varied among countries, according to new OECD-ECLAC-CIAT report

    Tax revenues in Latin American countries continue to rise but are lower as a proportion of their national incomes than in most OECD countries. Revenue Statistics in Latin America 2012 shows that Argentina and Brazil have the highest tax revenue to GDP ratio, while Guatemala and Dominican Republic stand at the lower end.

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  • 18-October-2013

    English

    Latin American Economic Outlook 2014

    The global scenario is less benign for the region due to a downturn in global trade, a decline in commodity prices and increased uncertainty surrounding external financing, says the new Latin American Economic Outlook.

  • 18-October-2013

    English

    Innovation, diversification and better logistics key to sustainable and inclusive growth, says latest Latin American Economic Outlook

    After a decade of relatively strong growth, Latin America is facing headwinds associated with declining trade, a moderation in commodity prices and increasing uncertainty over external financial conditions, according to the latest Latin American Economic Outlook jointly produced by the OECD Development Centre, the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (UN ECLAC) and CAF - Development Bank of Latin America.

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  • 23-November-2009

    English

    Latin American Economic Outlook 2010

    The Latin American Economic Outlook 2010 analyses the impact of the economic crisis in Latin America with a focus on migrations and remittances flows

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