Publications & Documents


  • 29-January-2018

    English

    African Union Commission and OECD Development Centre call for tapping immigrants’ contribution to Africa’s economic transformation

    The perceptions that international migration is first and foremost a South-North phenomenon and that immigrants cost more than they yield is widespread. Yet about eight out of ten African migrants leave for another African country. Their impact on the economies of host countries is generally positive though limited.

    Related Documents
  • 29-January-2018

    English

    Media invitation - Migration and job creation in Africa at the 30th African Union Summit

    Media invitation - 30th African Union Summit: Joint African Union Commission- OECD Development Centre Press conference “Migration and job creation in Africa”

    Related Documents
  • 24-January-2018

    Spanish

    El Centro de Desarrollo de la OCDE y la OIT llaman a aprovechar la contribución de los migrantes a fin de fomentar la transformación económica

    De qué manera los migrantes contribuyen a las economías de los países en desarrollo muestra que las percepciones negativas con frecuencia son injustificadas. El informe señala que los migrantes no constituyen una carga para las economías de los países de destino; su impacto sobre los mercados laborales, el crecimiento económico y las finanzas públicas con frecuencia es positivo aunque relativamente limitado.

    Related Documents
  • 24-January-2018

    English

    OECD Development Centre and ILO call for tapping immigrants’ contribution to foster economic transformation

    How immigrants contribute to developing countries’ economies shows that negative perceptions are often unjustified. It points out that immigrants are no burden on the economies of host countries, and that in developing countries, their impact on labour markets, economic growth and public finance is generally positive although relatively limited.

    Related Documents
  • 24-January-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries' Economies

    How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries' Economies is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The report covers the ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The project, Assessing the Economic Contribution of Labour Migration in Developing Countries as Countries of Destination, aimed to provide empirical evidence – both quantitative and qualitative – on the multiple ways immigrants affect their host countries.The report shows that labour migration has a relatively limited impact in terms of native-born workers’ labour market outcomes, economic growth and public finance in the ten partner countries. This implies that perceptions of possible negative effects of immigrants are often unjustified. But it also means that most countries of destination do not sufficiently leverage the human capital and expertise that immigrants bring. Public policies can play a key role in enhancing immigrants’ contribution to their host countries’ development.
  • 23-January-2018

    English

    DevTalks - Which Comes First in Development: Good Governance or Economic Growth? Unorthodox Insights from China and beyond

    The idea that economic growth needs good governance and good governance needs economic growth takes us to a perennial chicken-and-egg debate: Which comes first in development — good governance or economic growth? For decades, positions have been sharply divided between those who advocate “fix governance first” and others who say “stimulate growth first.”

    Related Documents
  • 23-January-2018

    English, PDF, 542kb

    NR-PD - Preliminary Agenda 9th Plenary Jan 2018 EN

    NINTH PLENARY MEETING OF THE POLICY DIALOGUE ON NATURAL RESOURCE-BASED DEVELOPMENT - Building collective knowledge for actionable policies - PRELIMINARY ANNOTATED Agenda - 31st January – 1st February 2018 - OECD, Paris (OECD Conference Centre)

    Related Documents
  • 22-January-2018

    English

    Invest more in training of young Malawians to strengthen economy, says new OECD Development Centre study

    Malawi’s economy has not grown fast enough in recent years to create decent jobs for the majority of its employable youth. Improving the supply of Technical, entrepreneurial and vocational education and training (TEVET) can provide them with better opportunities in the labour market, while fostering economic diversification and productivity, according to the OECD Development Centre’s Youth Well-Being Policy Review in Malawi.

    Related Documents
  • 22-January-2018

    English, Word doc, 959kb

    Advanced-Draft Guiding Principles for Durable Extractive Contracts

    This document is an output of the multi-stakeholder Negotiation Support Forum, an integral part of the OECD Policy Dialogue on Natural Resource-based Development’s Work Stream 3 on “Getting Better Deals”. The Negotiation Support Forum comprises a multi-stakeholder group of subject matter experts from government, the private sector, civil society and international organisations.

    Related Documents
  • 22-January-2018

    English

    Advanced Draft Guiding Principles for Durable Extractive Contracts

    At the Fourth Plenary Meeting of Policy Dialogue on Natural Resource-based Development held in December 2015 at the OECD in Paris, participating governments, industry and civil society agreed to pursue the dialogue on how contracts can be designed to withstand the test of time.

    Related Documents
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>