Publications & Documents


  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Swaziland African Economic Outlook 2017

    Economic growth remains subdued and is estimated to have slowed down in 2016 to -0.6%, mainly due to two factors, severe drought and fiscal pressures; while prospects will be sluggish in 2017 and 2018. The political scene has continued to be relatively stable since the September 2013 elections, but the country’s ranking in participation and human rights remains low.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Sudan African Economic Outlook 2017

    Economic growth slowed in 2016 to an estimated 3% as a result of the decline in oil production and macroeconomic imbalances and is projected at 3.4% in 2017 and 3.6% in 2018 on the back of improved performance in the non-oil sector and temporary lifting of US sanctions.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    South Sudan African Economic Outlook 2017

    Macroeconomic performance has continued to deteriorate because of the country’s fragile situation and continuing low worldwide oil prices while growth fell by 0.2% in 2015 and the fiscal and current account deficits have increased sharply.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    South Africa African Economic Outlook 2017

    Economic growth decelerated to 0.3% in 2016 although it is expected to rebound to 1.1% in 2017 and higher in later years. Growth prospects will be driven by moderately stronger global growth, more favourable weather conditions, reliable electricity supply, less volatile labour relations, recovering business and consumer confidence, and stabilising commodity prices.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Somalia African Economic Outlook 2017

    Real GDP growth in Somalia, estimated at 3.7% for 2016, is projected to decelerate to about 2.5% in 2017 because of lower agricultural output but will recover to about 3.5-4.5% in 2018-19. Creating jobs for the youth, providing social services such as education and health, and building sustainable livelihoods are the immediate key development challenges in Somalia.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Sierra Leone African Economic Outlook 2017

    The economy recovered from the after effects of the Ebola epidemic, growing by 4.3% in 2016 from -21.1% the year before. The country has introduced austerity measures in the 2017 budget, and is clearly moving towards a more restrictive trade regime by introducing new tariffs.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Seychelles African Economic Outlook 2017

    Growth slowed to 4.8% in 2016 from 5.7% in 2015 after a robust period of growth that allowed Seychelles to reach high-income status in 2015. The medium-term outlook is moderate, with real GDP projected to grow at 3.5% in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018, driven by tourism, ICT and fisheries.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Senegal African Economic Outlook 2017

    The economy grew by an estimated 6.7% in 2016, with 6.8% expansion predicted for 2017 and 7% in 2018. The Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG) ranked Senegal 10th out of 54 countries in 2016 and one of the three that improved their position in the four categories of the index.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Sao Tome and Principe African Economic Outlook 2017

    Sao Tome and Principe’s economy was estimated to have grown by 5% in 2016, led by agricultural investment and tourism, and growth is set to continue in 2017 and 2018 by 5.5% on average. The country has improved on the Mo-Ibrahim Index of African Governance moving to 11th place in 2016 from 13th in 2015 reflecting efforts to improve good governance.

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  • 24-May-2017

    English

    Rwanda African Economic Outlook 2017

    GDP growth slowed to 6.0% in 2016 and headline inflation rose sharply to 7.2%, the highest level since 2012. Rwanda remains peaceful and stable and preparation for the August 2017 presidential elections have commenced, with the constitution amended to address presidential term limits.

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