Development Centre

List of all examples currently in the compendium

 

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How to manage water scarcity and competing industrial and domestic use

  • 3.2.2.A. What can host governments do:

    1. Acknowledge  that  investment  in  water  security  drives  sustainable  growth,  and  invest  in infrastructures, institutions and information to manage water risks.
    2. Adopt  an  integrated  approach  to  water  resource  management  that  recognises  the  need  for  a negotiated process   to   co-ordinate   and   adjudicate   amongst   competing   users   to   ensure sustainable management of water resources.
    3. Consider non-conventional water sources, such as treated wastewater and desalinated water as alternatives  to  freshwater,  where  appropriate  from  an  economic,  social  and  environmental perspective.
  • 3.2.2. B What can extractives industries do:

    1. Engage with local communities and water users, at basin and catchment levels, to understand water - related issues and risks (risk of scarcity, flooding, pollution, and risks to ecosystems) and consider offering solutions. For instance, investments made in multi-purpose infrastructure that support water - related objectives.
    2. With due regard to anti-competitive concerns, collaborate with other extractives companies from the same basin to devise a common solution for water management and allocation. For example, a collective water treatment infrastructure solution might be less environmentally costly and more cost - effective for all parties than several treatment facilities.
  • 3.2.2.C. Host governments and extractives industries can work together to:

    1. Devise  mutually  beneficial  arrangements.  For  example,  when  a  company  develops  water treatment  facilities  allowing  excess  capacity  to  be  used  by  the  community.  The government and  the  water  utility  should  be  responsible  for  distribution  of  the  water  and  collection  of associated tariffs.

How can access to credit be facilitated for small and medium enterprises

  • 3.1 B. What can extractives industries do:

    1. Assess short - term costs associated with workforce and supplier capacity building initiatives as investments that will reduce operating costs in the long term.
    2. Evaluate the potential to make advance purchase orders, forward purchase agreements or implement other mechanisms that could help facilitate the integration of local suppliers in extractives sector value chains.

How to create employment opportunities in a remote mining area of Canada

  • 3.1 B. What can extractives industries do:

    1. Support capacity building for specific job or value chain - related skills, either directly or through joint training programmes/centres.
  • 3.1 A. What can host governments do:

    1. Develop plans for an inclusive local workforce and supplier participation, focusing on increasing the participation of vulnerable groups, such as women and indigenous peoples.
  • 3.1 C. Host governments and extractives industries can work together to:

    1. Collectively assess the capabilities of the available local workforce and local supply base by occupation and existing skills. Undertake a decomposition analysis of the industry demand for skilled and unskilled workers and suppliers, charting the changing skills profile by type and phases of projects and their locations. Consider strategies to increase participation of vulnerable and historically underrepresented groups, such as women and indigenous peoples.

How can the mining sector drive growth in grid-connected renewable energy?

  • 3.2.1 B. What can extractives industries do:

    1. Enable a sustainable strategy for leveraging extractives sector energy generation, by assessing the feasibility of renewable energy power generation options.

    2. In consultation with donors, governments, and utilities, assess the feasibility of installing a renewable energy-based mini grid instead of isolated generators and explore implementation and cost-sharing arrangements.
  • 3.2.1 C. Host governments and extractives industries can work together to:

    1. Undertake early discussions regarding power infrastructure needs and plans to determine if there are synergies, efficiencies and other opportunities for shared value creation with respect to power generation and distribution. This includes developing strategies for situations where there is no ready access to the electricity grid.
  • STEP 4. Support and contribute to innovation leading to new products and services

    4. B  What can extractives industries do?

    1. Leverage extractives sector operations to increase use of renewable energy, as appropriate. This could be done for example by either linking production to renewable energy (e.g. making use of solar and wind power to reduce the contribution of fossil fuels and green-house gases to mineral and oil & gas production, while reducing high electricity costs associated with the use of decentralised diesel generators) or by developing green supply chains (e.g. mining rare earths and supporting local manufacturing of magnets for wind turbines to provide clean energy or mining lithium to manufacture electric batteries for incorporation into green products).

How can mining catalyse the deployment of off-grid solar energy?

  • STEP 1 Adopt a comprehensive long-term vision and implementation strategy to build competitive and diversified economies and create in-country shared value out of natural resources.

    1 A. What can host governments do:

    1. Develop sustainable options for energy production and consumption, also assessing trade-offs and combined use of renewable and non-renewable resources.
  • STEP 3 Unlocking opportunities for in-country shared value creation

    3.1 B. What can extractives industries do:

    1. Develop electricity self-supply plans that align with government’s plans for electrification and local contexts.
    2. Enable a sustainable strategy for leveraging extractives sector energy generation, by assessing the feasibility of renewable energy power generation options.
    3. In consultation with donors, governments, and utilities, assess the feasibility of installing a renewable energy-based mini grid instead of isolated generators and explore implementation and cost-sharing arrangements.
  • STEP 4. Support and contribute to innovation leading to new products and services

    4 B. What can extractives industries do?

    1. Leverage extractives sector operations to increase use of renewable energy, as appropriate. This could be done for example by either linking production to renewable energy (e.g. making use of solar and wind power to reduce the contribution of fossil fuels and green-house gases to mineral and oil & gas production, while reducing high electricity costs associated with the use of decentralised diesel generators) or by developing green supply chains (e.g. mining rare earths and supporting local manufacturing of magnets for wind turbines to provide clean energy or mining lithium to manufacture electric batteries for incorporation into green products).

How can solar energy support more efficient enhanced oil recovery?

  • STEP 4 Support and contribute to innovation leading to new products and services

    4 B. What can extractives industries do?

    1. Leverage extractives sector operations to increase use of renewable energy, as appropriate. This could be done for example by either linking production to renewable energy (e.g. making use of solar and wind power to reduce the contribution of fossil fuels and green-house gases to mineral and oil & gas production, while reducing high electricity costs associated with the use of decentralised diesel generators) or by developing green supply chains (e.g. mining rare earths and supporting local manufacturing of magnets for wind turbines to provide clean energy or mining lithium to manufacture electric batteries for incorporation into green products).