Latest Documents


  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Agro-food economy holds key to a brighter future for young people in developing countries, says new OECD Development Centre study

    Today's world youth population -aged 10 to 24- is 1.8 billion people strong and represents the largest cohort ever transitioning to adulthood. Eighty-eight per cent of them live in developing countries. With the right policies in place, they can be influential actors of economic and social progress.

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  • 3-April-2018

    English, PDF, 2,483kb

    Better Policies for Better Youth Livelihoods: A guidance note for development practitioners

    This guide provides an overview of key challenges faced by youth in the countries studied and that the project considered being priority issue to be addressed urgently by governments and the development community.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    Togo: Launch of the Youth Well-being Policy Review of Togo, 14 March 2018, Lomé

    The OECD Development Centre, together with the Ministry of Grassroots Development, Crafts, Youth, and Youth Employment (MDBAJEJ) and the Delegation of the European Union to Togo organised an event in Lomé on 14 March 2018 to present the key findings and recommendations of the Youth Well-being Policy Review of Togo and to develop a roadmap identifying the key actions needed to implement the recommendations of the study.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    DevTalks - The Bertelsmann Transformation Index 2018

    Political instability is increasing, while trust in democratic institutions is falling. The quality of democracy, market-economic systems and governance has fallen to its lowest level in 12 years. Polarisation and repression seem to define the current global landscape. These are the key findings of the latest Transformation Index of the Bertelsmann Stiftung (BTI) released in March 2018.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda's Economy

    Immigrants' contribution to Rwanda's economy is relatively small, but growing. Unlike in many other developing countries, immigrants in Rwanda are on average better educated and work in more productive sectors than the native-born population. Although immigration is associated with a small reduction in the employment rate of the native-born population, immigrants' contribution to the Rwandan gross domestic product is higher than their share in employment. In addition, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they receive in government benefits, leading to a positive effect on the fiscal balance. A mix of migration policies, aimed at meeting labour market needs and fostering immigrants’ integration, and non-migration policies, intending to leverage the impact of immigration on the economy, would help enhance the contribution of immigrants to Rwanda’s economy.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 27-March-2018

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018 compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for 25 Latin American and Caribbean economies, the majority of which are not OECD member countries. The publication is based on the OECD Revenue Statistics database, which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean enables comparison of tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among the economies of the region and with OECD member countries. This publication is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, the OECD Development Centre, the Inter-American Center of Tax Administrations (CIAT), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).
  • 22-March-2018

    English

    Private philanthropy funding for development modest compared to public aid, but its potential impact is high, says OECD

    Though philanthropic flows are relatively modest compared to official development assistance (ODA), their contribution is substantial in certain sectors, according to a new OECD report. For the first time, Private Philanthropy for Development uses global, comparable data to analyse how private foundations are supporting development.

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  • 8-March-2018

    English, PDF, 12,441kb

    Young Moldova: Problems, Values and Aspirations

    This National Youth Survey of the Republic of Moldova was commissioned by the OECD to support the Ministry of Youth and Sports of the Republic of Moldova. The Republic of Moldova one of the participating countries in the Youth Inclusion Project implemented by the OECD Development Centre and co-financed by the European Union. The survey and its report as conducted by the Center of Sociological Investigations and Marketing ”CBS-AXA”.

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  • 1-March-2018

    English, PDF, 676kb

    OECD Youth Well-Being Policy Review of Jordan - Agenda

    The Youth Well-Being Policy Review of Jordan presents a snapshot of the situation of young people in Jordan with a special focus on youth’s labour market situation and civic engagement. In this launch the OECD will present the main findings, conclusions and recommendations of the review and brings together stakeholders to foster the exchange on topics relevant to youth well-being.

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  • 28-February-2018

    English

    OECD Emerging Markets Network - EMnet

    The Emerging Markets Network (EMnet) was established in 2007 by the OECD Development Centre as a platform of analysis, dialogue and experience sharing between multinationals of OECD countries and their emerging-world counterparts.

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