Latest Documents


  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Thailand: Economic and social progress has been remarkable but structural change is needed to create more quality jobs and overcome regional imbalances, according to new OECD report

    Thailand has made impressive economic and social progress over the past several decades, but must now take further steps to transform its economy and ensure that prosperity is shared more equally across the country, according to a new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

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  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Multi-Dimensional Review of Thailand (Volume 1) - Initial Assessment

    Thailand has made impressive progress over the past several decades, both in economic and social terms. Sustained strong growth and a rapidly modernising economy have turned Thailand into an upper middle-income country with a strong urban centre. Economic success has brought impressive social advancement. Poverty has plummeted, while education and health services have considerably expanded and improved. These achievements have brought Thailand to a new stage and a new set of challenges.Rising prosperity has not been shared equally across the country and economic transformation needs a boost. The share of those in precarious employment still exceeds half of the working population. The creation of new activities replacing low-productivity ones has slowed while rural migrants and urban poor lack the skills required for modern urban jobs. While Bangkok’s success as a metropolis has been key to Thailand’s transformation, thriving secondary cities are needed that can develop new sources of growth.Experience shows that development is not about getting everything right, but about getting right what matters most. The Initial Assessment of this Multi-Dimensional Review endeavors to identify the challenges and key constraints that must be overcome for Thailand to succeed. It offers recommendations related to informality, productivity and the management of natural resources, particularly water. The next volumes will provide further suggestions for action to address these challenges.
  • 6-April-2018

    Spanish

    Lanzamiento de las Perspectivas Económicas de América Latina 2018 - Repensando las instituciones para el desarrollo

    Las Perspectivas Económicas de América Latina 2018 se centran en el análisis de la creciente desconexión entre ciudadanos e instituciones públicas en la región de América Latina y el Caribe, ilustrada por una disminución de la confianza, la falta de buenos empleos y la disminución de la satisfacción con servicios públicos clave como salud y educación.

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  • 6-April-2018

    English

    Launch of the Latin American Economic Outlook 2018 - Rethinking Institutions for Development

    The Latin American Economic Outlook 2018 focuses on the analysis of the increasing disconnect between citizens and public institutions in the Latin American and the Caribbean region, illustrated by a decline of trust, the lack of good jobs and the decreasing satisfaction with key public services such as health and education.

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  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Agro-food economy holds key to a brighter future for young people in developing countries, says new OECD Development Centre study

    Today's world youth population -aged 10 to 24- is 1.8 billion people strong and represents the largest cohort ever transitioning to adulthood. Eighty-eight per cent of them live in developing countries. With the right policies in place, they can be influential actors of economic and social progress.

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  • 3-April-2018

    English, PDF, 2,483kb

    Better Policies for Better Youth Livelihoods: A guidance note for development practitioners

    This guide provides an overview of key challenges faced by youth in the countries studied and that the project considered being priority issue to be addressed urgently by governments and the development community.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    Togo: Launch of the Youth Well-being Policy Review of Togo, 14 March 2018, Lomé

    The OECD Development Centre, together with the Ministry of Grassroots Development, Crafts, Youth, and Youth Employment (MDBAJEJ) and the Delegation of the European Union to Togo organised an event in Lomé on 14 March 2018 to present the key findings and recommendations of the Youth Well-being Policy Review of Togo and to develop a roadmap identifying the key actions needed to implement the recommendations of the study.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    DevTalks - The Bertelsmann Transformation Index 2018

    Political instability is increasing, while trust in democratic institutions is falling. The quality of democracy, market-economic systems and governance has fallen to its lowest level in 12 years. Polarisation and repression seem to define the current global landscape. These are the key findings of the latest Transformation Index of the Bertelsmann Stiftung (BTI) released in March 2018.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda's Economy

    Immigrants' contribution to Rwanda's economy is relatively small, but growing. Unlike in many other developing countries, immigrants in Rwanda are on average better educated and work in more productive sectors than the native-born population. Although immigration is associated with a small reduction in the employment rate of the native-born population, immigrants' contribution to the Rwandan gross domestic product is higher than their share in employment. In addition, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they receive in government benefits, leading to a positive effect on the fiscal balance. A mix of migration policies, aimed at meeting labour market needs and fostering immigrants’ integration, and non-migration policies, intending to leverage the impact of immigration on the economy, would help enhance the contribution of immigrants to Rwanda’s economy.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 27-March-2018

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018 compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for 25 Latin American and Caribbean economies, the majority of which are not OECD member countries. The publication is based on the OECD Revenue Statistics database, which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean enables comparison of tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among the economies of the region and with OECD member countries. This publication is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, the OECD Development Centre, the Inter-American Center of Tax Administrations (CIAT), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).
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