Latest Documents


  • 20-June-2018

    English

    Recuperar la confianza de los ciudadanos en las instituciones es fundamental en América Latina y el Caribe para superar los desafíos de su proceso de desarrollo en transición y retomar una senda de crecimiento inclusivo

    El rápido crecimiento de la clase media en América Latina, que alcanzó un nivel de 35,4% de la población en 2016 (1 de cada 3 latinoamericanos, frente a 1 de cada 5 latinoamericanos en 2001) ha traído consigo un aumento de las aspiraciones y exigencias ciudadanas que hay que satisfacer.

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  • 20-June-2018

    English

    Better adapting migration policies to labour market needs would help Ghana’s economy, says new ILO-OECD Development Centre report

    Migration should be better integrated in labour market information and analysis. This could amplify the impact of Ghana’s efforts to enhance the economic contribution of migration, which culminated in 2016 with the adoption of a National Migration Policy aiming to mainstream migration into Ghana’s other development policies.

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  • 20-June-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Ghana's Economy

    Immigrant workers contribute to the Ghanaian economy in several ways. They are well integrated in labour markets in terms of employment, although female immigrants often face greater challenges than male immigrants. Even though much of the employment of immigrant workers appears to be demand-driven, immigration may have some displacement effects in particular for native-born women. The contribution of immigrants to the government’s fiscal balance exceeds the contribution of the native-born population on a per capita basis. The overall contribution of immigrants to GDP is estimated at 1.5%. Ghana is aiming to mainstream migration into development policies, and this objective would benefit from stronger labour market information and analysis systems.How Immigrants Contribute to Ghana’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis of secondary, and in some cases primary data sources.
  • 14-June-2018

    English

    DevTalks - A Comprehensive Strategy for Industrial Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: Insights from the Japan and East Asia experiences

    No universally accepted strategy for industrial development exists. In one of his latest research pieces, Professor Keijiro Otsuka proposes a Comprehensive Strategy for Industrial Development that seeks to develop industrial clusters in sub-Saharan Africa based on sequential support for three policy levers.

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  • 13-June-2018

    English

    Reforming the pension system is key to ensure better social protection coverage across the population in Kyrgyzstan, says new OECD Development Centre report

    Kyrgyzstan spends more on social protection than any other item of public expenditure but the benefits reach mainly the elderly, according to a Social Protection Systems Review (SPSR) of Kyrgyzstan produced by the OECD Development Centre as part of the European Union Social Protection Systems Programme (EU-SPS).

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  • 13-June-2018

    English

    Social Protection System Review of Kyrgyzstan

    Social protection is at the heart of Kyrgyzstan’s development and is a priority of public policy. Pension coverage among today’s elderly is universal and a large number of contributory and non-contributory programmes are in place to cover a wide range of risks. Kyrgyzstan has succeeded in maintaining the entitlements dating from the Soviet era while introducing programmes appropriate for its transition to a market economy. However, severe fiscal constraints have limited the coverage of these new arrangements and their capacity to adapt to challenges such as poverty, pervasive informality and emigration.
  • 12-June-2018

    Spanish

    Una mejor integración de los trabajadores inmigrantes impulsaría la economía de la República Dominicana, según el nuevo informe del Centro de Desarrollo OIT-OCDE

    La migración internacional ha sido una parte central del desarrollo de la República Dominicana. Si bien el país es un país de emigración neta con un 12% de la población que vive en el extranjero, también atrae a un número importante de inmigrantes, que representan el 4% de la población dominicana.

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  • 12-June-2018

    English

    Better integration of immigrant workers would boost the Dominican Republic’s economy, says new ILO-OECD Development Centre report

    The report provides an unprecedented analysis of immigrant workers’ contribution in three areas of the Dominican Republic’s economy: labour markets, economic growth and public finance. It shows that the labour market characteristics of immigrants and native-born workers in the Dominican Republic are very different.

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  • 12-June-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to the Dominican Republic's Economy

    A better understanding of the way immigrants affect the economy in the Dominican Republic can help policy makers make the most of immigration. This report finds that the immigration in the Dominican Republic has a varying but limited economic impact. Immigrants seem to displace native-born workers in the labour market by increasing competition, but no effects were found on the labour income of the native-born population. The estimated share of value added generated by immigrants is close to their share of the population. At the same time, immigrants make a positive contribution to the government budget as they pay more in direct taxes and benefit less from public expenditure than the native-born population. Policies aiming to facilitate the integration of immigrants and a better inclusion of immigration into different sectoral policies would further enhance the economic contribution of immigrants in the Dominican Republic.How Immigrants Contribute to the Dominican Republic's Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary and in some cases primary data sources.
  • 30-May-2018

    English

    The Future of Rural Youth in Developing Countries - Tapping the Potential of Local Value Chains

    Rural youth constitute over half of the youth population in developing countries and will continue to increase in the next 35 years. Without rural transformation and green industrialisation happening fast enough to create more wage employment in a sustainable manner, the vast majority of rural youth in developing countries have little choice but to work in poorly paid and unstable jobs or to migrate.As household dietary pattern is changing, new demands by a rising middle class for diversified and processed foods are creating new job opportunities in food-related manufacturing and services. Agro-food industries are labour-intensive and can create jobs in rural areas as well as ensure food security. Yet the employment landscape along the agro-food value chains is largely underexploited. This study looks at local actions and national policies that can promote agro-food value chains and other rural non-farm activities using a youth employment lens.
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