Latest Documents


  • 5-July-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Argentina's Economy

    The recent effects of immigration on the Argentine economy appear to be limited but positive. On average, immigration is not associated with job losses or income declines for the population born in Argentina. High-skilled immigration is on the contrary even associated with rising labour incomes among university graduates and female low-skilled immigration is associated with a higher labour-force participation of low-skilled native-born women. The estimated contribution of immigrants to value added is below their labour force participation share but above their population share. The estimated contribution of immigrants to public finance in 2013 was small. Additional migration and non-migration policies and better co-ordination between various policy areas could further improve the integration and economic contributions of immigrants.How Immigrants Contribute to Argentina’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary and in some cases primary data sources.
  • 3-July-2018

    Spanish

    El Centro de Desarrollo de la OCDE identifica reformas en gobernanza pública, protección social, salud y educación como prioridades para el desarrollo inclusivo de Paraguay

    Paraguay ambiciona llegar a ser un país próspero e inclusivo en 2030, con un Estado democrático, solidario, transparente y que promueva la igualdad de oportunidades. El crecimiento económico y la estabilidad macroeconómica alcanzados en los últimos 15 años constituyen un gran logro y un ingrediente fundamental para el progreso del bienestar ciudadano.

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  • 3-July-2018

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Paraguay - Volume I. Initial Assessment

    Paraguay has achieved strong and resilient growth and made progress across a range of development outcomes since it emerged from a prolonged period of economic and political instability in the early 2000s. In 2014, the country adopted its first National Development Plan, setting course towards an ambitious vision of the country’s future. To maintain the pace of economic growth and achieve more inclusive development Paraguay will need to overcome a number of institutional, economic and social constraints that challenge its development model. This first volume of the Multi-dimensional Review of Paraguay analyses the country’s development performance and presents the main constraints to the country’s development. It examines five broad areas, corresponding to the key areas of the Sustainable Development Goals: prosperity, people’s well-being, planet, peace and institutions, and partnerships and financing.
  • 25-June-2018

    English

    DevTalks - Development is broken: do NOT fix it

    The theory and practice of “using-the-future” in strategic perspective are gaining interest. This has implications for transformational experimentalist leadership as scholars and policy-makers analyse why the old order is falling apart and which signals may herald what’s ahead.

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  • 20-June-2018

    English

    Recuperar la confianza de los ciudadanos en las instituciones es fundamental en América Latina y el Caribe para superar los desafíos de su proceso de desarrollo en transición y retomar una senda de crecimiento inclusivo

    El rápido crecimiento de la clase media en América Latina, que alcanzó un nivel de 35,4% de la población en 2016 (1 de cada 3 latinoamericanos, frente a 1 de cada 5 latinoamericanos en 2001) ha traído consigo un aumento de las aspiraciones y exigencias ciudadanas que hay que satisfacer.

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  • 20-June-2018

    English

    Better adapting migration policies to labour market needs would help Ghana’s economy, says new ILO-OECD Development Centre report

    Migration should be better integrated in labour market information and analysis. This could amplify the impact of Ghana’s efforts to enhance the economic contribution of migration, which culminated in 2016 with the adoption of a National Migration Policy aiming to mainstream migration into Ghana’s other development policies.

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  • 20-June-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Ghana's Economy

    Immigrant workers contribute to the Ghanaian economy in several ways. They are well integrated in labour markets in terms of employment, although female immigrants often face greater challenges than male immigrants. Even though much of the employment of immigrant workers appears to be demand-driven, immigration may have some displacement effects in particular for native-born women. The contribution of immigrants to the government’s fiscal balance exceeds the contribution of the native-born population on a per capita basis. The overall contribution of immigrants to GDP is estimated at 1.5%. Ghana is aiming to mainstream migration into development policies, and this objective would benefit from stronger labour market information and analysis systems.How Immigrants Contribute to Ghana’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis of secondary, and in some cases primary data sources.
  • 14-June-2018

    English

    DevTalks - A Comprehensive Strategy for Industrial Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: Insights from the Japan and East Asia experiences

    No universally accepted strategy for industrial development exists. In one of his latest research pieces, Professor Keijiro Otsuka proposes a Comprehensive Strategy for Industrial Development that seeks to develop industrial clusters in sub-Saharan Africa based on sequential support for three policy levers.

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  • 13-June-2018

    English

    Reforming the pension system is key to ensure better social protection coverage across the population in Kyrgyzstan, says new OECD Development Centre report

    Kyrgyzstan spends more on social protection than any other item of public expenditure but the benefits reach mainly the elderly, according to a Social Protection Systems Review (SPSR) of Kyrgyzstan produced by the OECD Development Centre as part of the European Union Social Protection Systems Programme (EU-SPS).

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  • 13-June-2018

    English

    Social Protection System Review of Kyrgyzstan

    Social protection is at the heart of Kyrgyzstan’s development and is a priority of public policy. Pension coverage among today’s elderly is universal and a large number of contributory and non-contributory programmes are in place to cover a wide range of risks. Kyrgyzstan has succeeded in maintaining the entitlements dating from the Soviet era while introducing programmes appropriate for its transition to a market economy. However, severe fiscal constraints have limited the coverage of these new arrangements and their capacity to adapt to challenges such as poverty, pervasive informality and emigration.
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