Publications & Documents


  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Mauritius African Economic Outlook 2015

    Real GDP growth in 2014 was lower than expected at 3.2%, well under the 4% projected in the 2014 National Budget. Economic growth in 2013-14 was driven by the information and communications technology (ICT) sector and by the financial and insurance sector, which grew by 6.8% and 5.4%, respectively.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Mauritania African Economic Outlook 2015

    The economy remained healthy in 2014, growing an estimated 6.4% – higher than 5% for the third year running – and driven by a revival in fisheries and a robust mining sector, which compensated for lower oil production and manufacturing. With suitable policies and structural progress, the economy held up against falling iron and gold prices and insufficient rainfall.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Mali African Economic Outlook 2015

    The economy remained firm in 2014 and GDP growth increased to an estimated 5.8% after recovery began the previous year with an expansion of 1.7%. This was mainly due to the primary sector (up 9.4%), where good harvests boosted agriculture by 13%. The services sector (+4.8%) also contributed, with a revival of activity in transport and telecommunications (+7.4%) and commerce (+3%).

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Malawi African Economic Outlook 2015

    In 2014, Malawi’s economy continued on the path to recovery in the aftermath of the economic crisis of 2012, which saw a contraction in real gross domestic product (GDP) growth to 2.1%. Real GDP growth in 2014 is estimated to have been 5.7%, driven largely by agriculture, but with significant contributions from manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, and services.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Madagascar African Economic Outlook 2015

    A political and social crisis since 2009 meant that 2014 was a decisive year for Madagascar, with a new president elected, a fresh parliament installed and a new government sworn in, thus enabling the country to rejoin the international community.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Libya African Economic Outlook 2015

    Fiscal sustainability continues to be in disarray because control over the major source of revenue has fallen out of official control. The combination of lower petroleum exports and the dramatic fall in the price of oil resulted in revenues down by 63% in 2014 (from a budget of 57 billion Libyan dinars (LYD) in 2013 to LYD 20.9 billion in 2014).

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Liberia African Economic Outlook 2015

    The Ebola outbreak has had a severe impact on Liberia’s economic and social progress. More than 4 000 Liberians have died in the health crisis. Although the disease is progressively being contained in early 2015, the spill-over effects on economic growth, investment and access to social services have reduced growth in 2014 to around 1.8% and will have an adverse impact over the medium term.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Lesotho African Economic Outlook 2015

    Lesotho’s economy is projected to attain modest growth averaging 4.9% over the medium term (2015-16), in spite of the constraining factors related to subdued growth in mining and quarrying and the effects of delayed renewal of the United States’ African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) which expires in 2015, on the manufacturing of textiles and clothing.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Kenya African Economic Outlook 2015

    GDP growth remained robust in 2013 at 5.7% based on rebased statistics, and stood at 4.4%, 5.8% and 5.5% in the first three quarters of 2014 compared with 6.4%, 7.2% and 6.2% in comparable quarters of 2013.

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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Guinea-Bissau African Economic Outlook 2015

    After a period of transition, marked by a slowing of the economy, the return to constitutional order led to growth estimated at 2.6% in 2014, against 0.9% in 2013 and -1.5% in 2012. Supported by the return to political normalisation and the re-engagement of technical and financial partners, growth was also driven by cashew-nut exports, in contrast to 2013.

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